Obamacare in the Crosshairs, Again

David Thornton

David Thornton is a freelance writer and professional pilot who has also lived in Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Texas. He is a graduate of the University of Georgia and Emmanuel College. He is Christian conservative/libertarian who was fortunate enough to have seen Ronald Reagan in person during his formative years. A former contributor to The Resurgent, David now writes for the Racket News with fellow Resurgent alum, Steve Berman, and his personal blog, CaptainKudzu. He currently lives with his wife and daughter near Columbus, Georgia. His son is serving in the US Air Force. You can find him on Twitter @CaptainKudzu and Facebook.

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8 Responses

  1. Philip H
    Ignored
    says:

    Given the market-based nature of health insurance and health care delivery in the US, you can’t get:

    I do think that the American health insurance system, based as it is upon healthcare that is tied to employers, is still badly in need of an overhaul that breaks that nonsensical link.

    Without

    top-down solutions and mandates

    Like all sorts of other market failures, healthcare won’t remedy itself without government action. In that regard the ACA was a failure, in that it tried to preserve a market-based approach (to attract GOP votes as you may recall) instead of creating a single payer system that would effectively break the job-insurance tie you speak of.Report

    • North in reply to Philip H
      Ignored
      says:

      IIRC the American phenomena of healthcare being tied to employment is, itself, a relic from a bygone tax policy era where it was tax advantageous for employees and employers to fold their healthcare costs into employee compensation. So government caused that particular issue and that somewhat undermines your claim that only government can resolve it.Report

      • Philip H in reply to North
        Ignored
        says:

        Seems to me if government created the problem – and I agree there’s some federal post-WW2 history there – government can and should solve the problem. the Private sector sure hasn’t, and likely won’t.Report

        • North in reply to Philip H
          Ignored
          says:

          I mean, I’m mildly in favor of Canadian style healthcare while also being keenly cognizant of its challenges, deficiencies and costs and they are very real and would be fiercely resented by voters.

          But really the small government ship sailed with the Reagan era law that forbids hospitals from verifying ability to pay before providing treatment. And that law is unassailable because going after it would rightly be cast as “the poor dying in the streets act”.Report

  2. Jaybird
    Ignored
    says:

    “Put out the fire.”
    “But what will you replace it with?”

    I just think that the biggest problem is that the government is really good at stimulating demand and not really good at stimulating supply. Maybe we could try stimulating supply for a while? Assume that health care is a consumer good and treat it as such?Report

  3. Burt Likko
    Ignored
    says:

    IOETRW the PPACA was going to be the literal death of the Republic; a shiv pushed hard and deep into the frail but still beating heart of liberty, democracy, and prosperity by cynical and power-hungry technocrats hellbent on turning America into Finland, by denying middle-class Americans their God-given Constitutional right to go uninsured.

    Yeah, let Trump trot that rhetoric out again. He had the chance to come up with a repeal plan and it was literally a book of blank pages. As perfect a symbol for his governing strategy as anything I or any other of his critics could have conceived.

    As for “bottom-up reform,” that might mean a state rather than the feds imposing the reform on the health insurers. The last time that happened, it was indeed led by a Republican governor who, when he later ran for President, got put in the logically impossible position of defending his own system while criticizing the feds for effectively copying it on a national scale. Republicans are just plain snakebit on this issue.

    Also note that this essay contains a fantastic example of the creativity of capital to find the holes in any system and maximize profits. We needn’t believe any cries of “the insurers won’t make any profits and go under!” They’ll be fine.Report

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