Capitol Police Officer Michael Bryd Interviewed About Shooting Death of Ashli Babbitt

Andrew Donaldson

Born and raised in West Virginia, Andrew has since lived and traveled around the world several times over. Though frequently writing about politics out of a sense of duty and love of country, most of the time he would prefer discussions on history, culture, occasionally nerding on aviation, and his amateur foodie tendencies. He can usually be found misspelling/misusing words on Twitter @four4thefire and his writing website Yonder and Home.

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6 Responses

  1. Doctor Jay
    Ignored
    says:

    Many times in the last 10 years or so, we have seen situation where an officer shoots someone. Many of those have been a problem, and something that it’s not ok for the police to do. In many, but not all. In others, it has seemed like a solid shoot to me, which puts me at odds with many of my liberal comrades.

    This is more solid than many of those. I can’t fathom what people thought was going to happen other than what did happen.

    I’ve heard comments from other police officers on that day to the effect that they didn’t start using guns because their observation was that they would be outgunned if the shooting were to start. Not because it wasn’t justified. Officers on that day had every reason to fear for their lives.

    I personally wish to thank Officer Byrd for his service.Report

    • JS in reply to Doctor Jay
      Ignored
      says:

      If I remember the article correctly, this is the only time he’s fired his gun (outside of, you know, the range and stuff) in almost 30 years of service.

      And he still waited until the very last possible second.

      You know what kills me about the video though? Despite them literally trying to break the last door between them and the floor, with all those Congressmen, when the shot rang out — they still shouted “active shooter” and panicked, because they literally could not fathom the idea that an officer shot at them. They clearly thought someone else was shooting, from some unknown place, and not the officer holding his gun, aimed at them, as they tried to break through a window.

      They had a riot, then an insurrection, and it clearly never occurred to them that they might get shot.

      They were damn lucky that other officer lured them away from Pence, undoubtable saving their lives, as Pence’s Secret Service detail would not have played around either.Report

  2. Burt Likko
    Ignored
    says:

    It would have been best if she’d have not been there in the first place. Second best if she’d have left peaceably having made her political point. Third best if she’d have heeded the calls that violence was about to be returned upon her and her fellow rioters and backed down. But instead we got to the last resort.

    She’s not a martyr. She’s a criminal who was shot, while engaged in the commission of her crimes, by a police officer who very reasonably believed that the use of force was needed to defend himself and the people he was charged by law with protecting. We call other police officers who do this “heroes” and both legally and morally justify their actions. Officer Byrd is at least as much a hero as any other police officer in that circumstance. He has my best wishes for a recovery from the trauma of having had to have taken a life, which no doubt was the very last thing he ever wanted from his public service career. Ms. Babbitt’s family also has my sympathies for their loss; they surely loved her and now she’s gone.

    It’s an awful thing, what happened because Donald Trump refused to publicly acknowledge that he lost the election, as fair and square as any President loses any election. Disrespecting democracy is a bloody business.Report

  3. Koz
    Ignored
    says:

    She’s not a martyr. She’s a criminal who was shot, while engaged in the commission of her crimes, by a police officer who very reasonably believed that the use of force was needed to defend himself and the people he was charged by law with protecting. We call other police officers who do this “heroes” and both legally and morally justify their actions.

    Most of the respectable Right has argued this, it really doesn’t hold up. It’s possible to be sympathetic that Michael Byrd was in a difficult position, but still realize that his exoneration was a whitewash. I’d feel better if a grand jury came back no true bill, but it didn’t even get that far.

    For whatever happened on January 6, I think it simply has to be acknowledged that Ashli Babbitt was not an imminent threat to anybody’s life or limb at the time she was shot. She and the people she was with were potential threats, but I don’t think the police are authorized to use lethal force based on coulda shoulda woulda.

    Alternatively, there’s “mob law” jurisprudence from the 19th century or whatever that says that if a person is being besieged by a mob, he’s entitled to use lethal force against any member of the mob. It seems to me that’s the actual logic by which Lt Byrd is being exonerated. But I’m pretty sure that those cases really aren’t in force today.

    I think Lt Byrd is being sued by Ashli Babbitt’s family. Based on what we’ve seen so far, I hope he loses. He still ends up ahead of Ashli Babbitt.Report

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