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Retroactive: This Week in Ordinary Times

Retroactive: This Week in Ordinary Times

This past week, at Ordinary Times:The Magic of Ben Shapiro; When Schools Get Political, What Should Teachers Do?; By a thousand cuts; Yes Hannity Cohen is in fact your lawyer and you should be glad; Letter to younger myself #1: The anti-gay rights amendment; National School Walkout Day, 19 years after Columbine

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It’s Time to Unbundle Health Insurance and Health Care

John C. Goodman in his book Priceless: Curing the Healthcare Crisis argues that Obamacare will not make health care better or more affordable because it doubles down on the same genetic defects as before–the ill-conceived bundling of health care and health insurance. Reformers opposed to Obamacare will be unable to propose a real solution until they see the problem.

Meanwhile, Our Children Continue Their Undaunted Assault on Mammon…

I have a piece up at the Atlantic called “What’s Really Behind the Ever-Rising Cost of Raising a Child in America“. You should go read (and comment) there. To summarize: the cost of raising a child has increased substantially since 1960, but almost all of this increase is in areas such as education and health…

Let’s Get Dangerous Serious

As much as I appreciate Jamelle’s Darkwing Duck references (though personally, I’ve always preferred TaleSpin), I think he’s being a bit unfair to skeptics of health insurance reform here. Jamelle argues that we can’t have a real, rational debate over health care without agreeing to some shared premises. Well, that’s a bit more difficult than…

Health Care and Ping Pong

By Wyeth Ruthven Forget conference committees, any observer of health care reform needs to add the term “ping-pong” to their legislative vocabulary. Ping-pong is a little known but increasingly used procedural device to pass legislation. A 2008 report by Walter Oleszek for the Congressional Research Service describes ping-pong as “the exchange of amendments between the…

Healthcare and monopoly

Russell Arben Fox asks: How should a distributist or localist or communitarian in America feel about proposals which would attempt to provide the same sort of equalization which Democratic party reformers are squawking about, but do so solely on a state-by-state (or perhaps region-by-region) basis? Just more of the same? No different from any other…

You don’t know what you’re talking about, do you?

Note: This was a shitty movie. So, if Memeorandum is any indication, a few conservative bloggers have taken to mining fourth-rate dialogue from third-rate science fiction movies in order to make an absurd point about how a modest package of insurance reforms amounts to an attack on liberty itself. I asked something along these lines on Facebook…

Deep Inside of a Parallel Universe

Reihan doesn’t think that we should dismiss Republican intransigence as irrational or nihilistic (via Andrew Sullivan): Among Democrats and liberals, there is a belief that Republican opposition to the various Democratic proposals represents a kind of “nihilism,” and that because Baucuscare resembles proposals offered by liberal and moderate Republicans in the 1990s, today’s opposition is…

Hayek on Health Insurance

I don’t know how, during the long months of this health insurance debate, this quote from Road To Serfdom slipped my mind, but it certainly bears re-emphasis: “Nor is there any reason why the state should not assist the individuals in providing for those common hazards of life against which, because of their uncertainty, few…

Obama’s Well Nigh Impossible Wed. Night Task

President Obama’s two biggest problems politically are 1. a frankly crazy and irresponsible minority GOP party (with plenty of enablers to be sure) and 2. His own party affiliation. In the immortal words of Will Rogers, President Obama is not a member of any organized political party, he’s a Democrat. If the House Dems are…