do nothing

Interesting column from Bruce Bartlett.  I honestly haven’t made up my mind where I stand on the stimulus.  There are many competing theories on how best to implement stimulus.  Monetary policy?  Fiscal policy?  Should federal dollars be used to shore up state and local governments?  What strings will be attached?  Maybe we should just keep…

quote for a friday afternoon

“Let’s see if we can have a reasoned discussion about end-of-life counseling.  We might start by asking Sarah Palin to leave the room. I’ve got nothing against her. She’s a remarkable political talent. But there are no “death panels” in the Democratic health-care bills, and to say that there are is to debase the debate.”…

Crickets

National Review’s response to former Homeland Security Secretary Tom Ridge’s allegation that Bush pressured him to raise the terror alert status on the eve of the 2004 election is this stirring post from Kathryn Jean Lopez: But how can someone whose title is director of homeland security not resign if he believes the security of…

None dare call it justice

Following Freddie’s lead, I confess I’m rather baffled by Alex Massie’s sympathetic take on the Lockerbie Bomber’s release. As I understand it, this is a man duly convicted of murdering hundreds of innocent airline passengers. Through his involvement, al-Megrahi forfeited any claims on our compassion above certain minimal standards of humane treatment. Massie suggests that…

Correctly Political: Wealth Care, a Historical Note

~by jfxgillis Okay. So here’s the thing about the health care industry in the USA, especially the insurance sector. It stinks. Everyone knows it. Everyone feels it. We pay more for what we get, and we get less for what we pay for, than virtually any other developed country by any systemic measure. Even people with gold-plated…

life and death sentences

You can count me among those who, in regards to the Abdelbaset Ali al-Megrahi situation, think a life sentence means just that– you spend the rest of your life in prison, and it doesn’t matter if you’re going to die of old age or of bowel cancer or whatever else. You’ve been condemned to live…

Glenn Greenwald

is entirely right, and on the occasion of his post, I say again that the culturally and socially liberal leanings of many reporters cannot begin to overwhelm the reflexive, self-congratulatory political anti-leftism of the national media. Many people, foremost “a little criticism for column A/a little for column B”-style Broderist centrists like Conor Clark, have…

Idea of the Day

From Daniel Gross at Newsweek: After the stock-research scandals of the 1990s, analysts were required to disclose whether they or their families owned stock in the companies they were talking about. That has since emerged as a key gauge of credibility. I’d like to see something similar for the health care debate. Before they weigh…

the unintended consequences of economic populism

“POPULIST, n. A fossil patriot of the early agricultural period, found in the old red soapstone underlying Kansas; characterized by an uncommon spread of ear, which some naturalists contend gave him the power of flight, though Professors Morse and Whitney, pursuing independent lines of thought, have ingeniously pointed out that had he possessed it he…

How I would have written Scalia’s dissent

Troy Davis, originally convicted of murdering an off-duty cop under questionable circumstances, will now have his case reviewed by order of the Supreme Court. Justice Scalia dissented, however, and his opinion isn’t exactly a model of human empathy: “This court,” Scalia pointed out, “has never held that the Constitution forbids the execution of a convicted…

quote of the day

from Gregg Easterbrook: “While the fixed vote in Iran received extensive international attention, the world paid no notice to an honest election in Indonesia — the world’s largest Muslim nation. As recently as the 1970s, Indonesia was a repressive military dictatorship; gradually it has become a democracy with a civil-society basis and freedom of speech,…

health care on the radio

If you have time, check out James Joyner and Dave Schuler on OTB radio this evening, discussing “the latest developments in the health care debate, the evolving situations in Iraq and Afghanistan, furloughing government workers, and whatever else we meander into.”

Time Travel

My favorite movie that involves time traveling is Twelve Monkeys.  Anybody know a better time-travel flick?  And, beyond that, has anyone ever seen a time traveling film that made enough sense to be believable?  I find time travel to be the most difficult plot device – it is either used lazily or despite its clever…

reminder

We have a COMMENTING POLICY by the way, y’all. Newbies and old timers alike are more than welcome to read it.  It’s more of a suggested guidelines deal, but it really does work to keep discussion on an even keel.

I ain’t got time for this jibba jabba

Among many – many – other things, I wish political commentators would stop explaining away our near-constant legislative gridlock as some inevitable, quasi-mystical part of the democratic process.  For instance, here’s Peter Suderman (guest-posting for Andrew Sullivan) describing the “problem with politics”: No, I don’t think this is a failure of leadership so much as…

‘Graf for the Day

From Religion News at Pew Forum: The three men were locals who were said to have once crossed into nearby Afghanistan to wage war alongside the Taliban. They then returned, militant wayfarers apparently bent on inciting an Afghan-style insurgency in this tinderbox of a valley in Central Asia. By late June, they were holed up…

Objectively Pro-Death Panel

I’m sure someone has already made this point, but if you take the idea of a “death panel” seriously, it doesn’t really seem like that terrible of an idea.  As I’m sure most of you know, you can apply the Pareto principle (more commonly known as the 80/20 rule) to the distribution of health care…