Ten Second News

Book Review: <i>Seveneves</i> by Neal Stephenson

Book Review: Seveneves by Neal Stephenson

In a sense, it is the perfect speculative fiction novel, even as it pays unspoken homage to a similarly-themed book by very different authors from thirty-eight years ago.

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Andrew Napolitano and the Pollardism of Slave Condemnation

Could Abraham Lincoln really have sidestepped the entire American Civil War by using the government’s power of property condemnation to buy all of the slaves in the South and then free them?

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There It Is — Take It

Burt Likko celebrates the history of a city that seems all too frequently to act as though it had none, on the centennial anniversary of an important, oft-overlooked event. In the beginning was a ditch…

I’m having a hard time deciding which I find harder to believe…

… that Mississippi didn’t ratify the slavery-banning 13th Amendment until 1995, that after they did no one bothered turning in the paper work until just last week, that the only reason anyone thought to do anything at all now was because of the movie Lincoln, or that despite talk of it being passed “unanimously,” in…

A Great Case Out Of Sequence: Bad Valentines, Bank Robbers, And Taxes

Note: This post is part of our League Symposium on Guns In America. You can read the introductory post for the Symposium here. To see a list of all posts in the Symposium so far, click here. While I usually post my Great Cases at my sub-blog (example) rather than here on the front page,…

Abortion and Slavery again

Ta-Nehisi has pushed once again into the abortion and slavery debate, this time following the invocation of that analogy by Rick Santorum and Joe Klein’s subsequent defense of Santorum’s rhetoric. Now, I’ve admitted in the past two things about the fetus-as-slave analogy: first, that it is not a very good analogy – and indeed I…

A Response to Paul Krugman

by Christopher Carr Nobel Prize winning economist Paul Krugman’s existence in the popular consciousness largely rests on ideological antagonism.  Krugman’s infamous September 2009 New York Times Magazine editorial, “How Did Economists Get It So Wrong?“, attacking University of Chicago’s John Cochrane and others, was the “Hit Em Up” of economic policy debate. “How Did Economists Get…

The conservative disposition

Jason has just given you the liberal-libertarian disposition, so I thought I’d try my hand at explaining why I’m sometimes drawn to the conservative alternative. My knowledge of political philosophy is almost nil, so I’ll avoid name-checking prominent thinkers. Instead, I want to explain where I differ from Jason’s historical perspective. Jason views society as…

History Thursday

I aggregate so you don’t have to: From The Dreyfus Affair to the Eiffel Tower, the conflict between Church and State in late 19th century France; remembering the Berlin Airlift, 1948-49; Christopher Hitchens reviews Wolf Hall, a novel of Henry VIII and the English Reformation; ‘6os German radicalism in the shadow of the Holocaust, and…

Correctly Political: Wealth Care, a Historical Note

~by jfxgillis Okay. So here’s the thing about the health care industry in the USA, especially the insurance sector. It stinks. Everyone knows it. Everyone feels it. We pay more for what we get, and we get less for what we pay for, than virtually any other developed country by any systemic measure. Even people with gold-plated…

reflections

Sometimes I’m overwhelmed with this sense that all of this is an exercise in futility – that there is simply too much to know, too much I don’t know, too much I don’t or can’t understand.  My ignorance on this or that subject is laid bare by the revelation of some new fact, some history…