Author: Em Carpenter

Em was one of those argumentative children who was sarcastically encouraged to become a lawyer, so she did. She is a proud life-long West Virginian, and, paradoxically, a liberal. In addition to writing about society, politics and culture, she enjoys cooking, podcasts, reading, and pretending to be a runner. She will correct your grammar. You can find her on Twitter.
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Wednesday Writs for 7/10

This week’s Writs include Santeria, a couple of alleged perverts, updates on the case against Botham Jean’s killer, Amazon faces product liability, Sublime and more.

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The Case for Keeping Jeffrey Epstein Behind Bars

To determine a defendant’s risk of flight and danger to the community, the Bail Reform Act sets forth the specific factors to be considered when bail is requested, and it seems the feds have a pretty good case on all four.

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Wednesday Writs for 7/3

This week: 2 Live Crew, SCOTUS updates, bad lawyers, bad judges, really bad judges, and the worst judges. Also: Weird Al.

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Wednesday Writs for 6/26

Your Wednesday Writs are packed: SCOTUS on flag burning, the first familial DNA murder trial; THAT lawyer, dumb criminals, the F word and more.

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Wednesday Writs for 6/19 – West Virginia Day Edition!

It’s Wednesday Writs, West Virginia Day edition! WV Day isn’t until tomorrow, but now is a good time to brush up on how we became a state, in our case of the week. Also: several SCOTUS updates, a “Cops” expose, John Denver, and more!

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Lessons From a Bike Thief

My kids are unfamiliar with want. It was the constant, extended wanting that made me resolved to remove myself from poverty as an adult; my kids will have to find the motivation for that elsewhere.

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Wednesday Writs for 6/12

This week: the Christian burial case, Alabama on a roll, lawful lemonade & lawless ice cream trucks, a cephalon in dispute, and Masterpiece Cakeshop, again.

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Wednesday Writs for 6/5

Our weekly roundup of the best law and legal related news around the web includes SCOTUS on the First Amendment, Anti-SLAPP and licensing reform out of Colorado, Jeopardy leaks and, as always, badly behaving lawyers and dumb criminals.

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The End of the Beginning

Forty is do or die, give up or hold out, wind up or wind down. It’s the beginning of the end or the end of the beginning. Forty is the precipice between “can I see your ID” and free coffee at McDonalds. If life were a cheeseburger, forty would be the patty

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Wednesday Writs for May 29

Wednesday Writs are back with the Scopes Monkey Trial, SCOTUS updates, dumb lawyers and dumber criminals.

government 16

It Really is All About the Money

Pretending to be bewildered at the failure of recruitment and retention efforts while denying that compensation plays a role is bad business, even for government.

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Down in New Orleans

The city has been destroyed many times over, by war, fire, disease, and flood. Each time, she comes back to life, more vibrant than before but with another layer of rich history atop her deep and storied façades.

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Wednesday Writs for May 15

This week’s Wednesday Writs include the backstory of Miranda, history making beauty queens, good news for ninjas and hippies, dumb criminals, and more.

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Wednesday Writs for 5/8

This week: Lawrence v. Texas, ill-conceived lawsuits, lawyers turned jazz musicians, jury duty excuses and litigation for the horses.

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Scouting, Moving Forward, Struggles to Carry its Baggage

It is possible that scouting’s heyday is past. Its admirable attempts to be more inclusive and evolve and change with the times in other ways may have been untenable to those clinging to the tradition the scouts represent.

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Mother Sued for Uncovering Abuse

The School Board and all involved are entitled to defend themselves, but decision to counter-attack the mother because she exposed the atrocities happening in that classroom is a ruthless and tasteless move on behalf of a body of public servants.

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Wednesday Writs for May 1st

Even in the early 70s, lawyers arguing at SCOTUS didn’t get very far before being peppered with questions. Ginsburg argued for 11 straight minutes.

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Wednesday Writs for 4/24

It’s time Wednesday Writs, your roundup of the best legal and law related links from around the web. This week: juvenile justice, illegal vegetable gardens, dumb criminals, Scooby Doo and more.