Navajo Code Talker Samuel Sandoval Passes; Only Three Code Talkers Remain

Burt Likko

Pseudonymous Portlander. Homebrewer. Atheist. Recovering Republican. Recovering Catholic. Recovering divorcé. Editor-in-Chief Emeritus of Ordinary Times. Relapsed Lawyer, admitted to practice law (under his real name) in California and Oregon. On Twitter, to his frequent regret, at @burtlikko. House Likko's Words: Scite Verum. Colite Iusticia. Vivere Con Gaudium.

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6 Responses

  1. Michael Cain
    Ignored
    says:

    WWII is quickly passing into “not in living memory” territory. Won’t be too many more years before Korea suffers the same fate. Vietnam strikes closer to me, since I was of draftable age near the end (and considering which of several unattractive options to take). There’s some small college in the Midwest noted for its letter to faculty each year, reminding them of historical events and/or language phrases and/or technology that they can’t assume incoming freshmen will know (eg, rotary dial phones). I remember when someone forwarded to me the letter that said for the new freshmen, Vietnam was as much “part of history” as WWII.Report

    • CJColucci in reply to Michael Cain
      Ignored
      says:

      Beloit College used to do it, but Marist College has recently taken it over. Sadly, they have decided to be “more substantive” about it.

      https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2020/09/09/marist-takes-over-mindset-list-it-changesReport

    • Kazzy in reply to Michael Cain
      Ignored
      says:

      Perhaps an apocryphal story, but supposedly a kid found an old floppy disk and remarked how someone had 3D printed the “Save” icon.

      And even now the Save icon feels kind of outdated.

      What’s interesting to me is how often vestiges of the past stay with us long after their original purpose has been retired. For instance (and I’m sure someone here — probably even you, MCain — will know more about this than I) but many of the sounds we associate with phones (e.g., the ringing we here through the phone when placing a call) were related to the actual mechanics of early phones but are now added into cell phones and the like because people would be thrown off if they were absent. There is no reason for phones to make those sounds nowadays but we kind of rely on them to know the phone is working.

      We all sort of understand these things in context but ask a young person what they actually mean/do and they’ll likely be befuddled.Report

  2. Burt Likko
    Ignored
    says:

    I tried to put this in the “Ten Second News” column but failed. No matter. This reminder of a remarkable moment in our history, made possible by our unique heritage and diversity and by the bravery of men who had every reason to be resentful of the nation which they nevertheless served with such distinction and effect, is worth a top line mention.Report

  3. Burt Likko
    Ignored
    says:

    Got it. I’ll… I’ll try harder next time.Report

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