Sunday Morning! “Pierre and Jean” by Guy de Maupassant

Rufus F.

Rufus is an American curmudgeon in Canada. He has a PhD in History, sings in a garage rock band, and does many things. He is the author of the forthcoming book "The Paris Bureau" from Dio Press (early 2021).

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6 Responses

  1. Saul Degraw
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    says:

    I did not like Kiling Commodore when it came out and am giving it a second try.Report

  2. PD Shaw
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    says:

    I read a collection of “ghost stories” from Maupassant a few months ago, mostly not about ghosts, possibly should have been described as Poe stories. It was as such collections go somewhat hit and miss, with the first person narrator frequently assuring us that ‘you must think me mad, but hear me out . . .’ The last story, which I think was true both for the book and the author contained this description of his introversion that I liked:

    “We are, on earth, two distinct races. Those who have need of others, whom others amuse, engage soothe, whom solitude harasses, pains, stupefies, like the movement of a terrible glacier or the traversing of the desert; and those, on the contrary, whom others weary, tire, bore, silently torture, whom isolation calms and bathes in the repose of independency, and plunges into the humors of their own thoughts. In fine, there is here a normal, physical phenomenon. Some are constituted to live a life outside of themselves, others, to live a life within themselves. As for me, my exterior associations are abruptly and painfully short-lived, and, as they reach their limits, I experience in my whole body and in my whole intelligence an intolerable uneasiness.”

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    • Rufus F. in reply to PD Shaw
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      says:

      Yeah, Maupassant wrote a LOT of stories considering he started kind of late and died at age 43. He wrote about 300 short stories and a handful of novels and essays. Most of the story collections I’ve read have been a bit hit or miss, but with a few stories among the best I’ve read.Report

  3. LeeEsq
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    says:

    I’m reading the U.S.A trilogy by John Dos Passos. One of the interesting and maybe sad things is that the type of modernist novels that played with language and writing because many plots were deemed done have fallen into disfavor. Even literary novelists seem to write in a more uncreative way than writers in the period between 1910 and maybe 1940 did.Report

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