LinkedIn Posts Are Decadent and Depraved

Mason Pelt

Mason Pelt is a sporadic writer, and the managing director of Push ROI, Inc.

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23 Responses

  1. Damon
    Ignored
    says:

    Linkin is still around?Report

  2. Dark Matter
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    says:

    Linkin has content? Faict it’s a place to post your resume.Report

    • Marchmaine in reply to Dark Matter
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      says:

      Right. LinkedIn isn’t social media, it’s an animated rolodex.

      Of course the post is correct that most of the ‘content’ on LinkedIn is disastrously bad qua content… but the key to LinkedIn is *never* to post content. That’s the mark of a true professional.

      Or, failing that, friendly advertising of *someone else’s achievements* or success is the maximum I’d allow. Like, the humble brag that a client of yours has received some sort of public recognition? Ok, advanced networking – I’ll allow it. But, your personal thoughts on anything? As a hiring manager, I’m probably going to give you a miss.Report

      • InMD in reply to Marchmaine
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        says:

        Exactly. Intelligent people understand its real utility is keeping your current employer honest by virtue of your info being innocently shared with hordes of voracious head hunters and corporate recruiters. No one cares about the asinine crap people post.Report

        • Philip H in reply to InMD
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          says:

          I don’t find it all asinine, but then again I’m probably t he only federal oceanographer who could do an MPA in his sleep because I read a LOT of Harvard Business Review articles and watch regular TEDX talks on how to manage and lead people better. I do amplify my colleagues achievements, and I do post jobs I think people might be interested in.

          Like all social media, you get out of it what you put into it.Report

          • InMD in reply to Philip H
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            says:

            The big part of my skillset other than healthcare regulatory/privacy is commercial contract negotiation. This results in my world of connections being very sales heavy. Outrageous puffery ensues. However I never deny a connection since I never know where my next job offer will come from. I see no upside to closing off any avenue of finding the gem of an employee, that is me.Report

      • Oscar Gordon in reply to Marchmaine
        Ignored
        says:

        This. I post news bits of interesting stuff (like some Comp Sci article). Nothing else.Report

  3. John Puccio
    Ignored
    says:

    LinkedIn is a remarkable anomaly in the digital age. I can’t think of another company that has managed to be so successful by simply being first to market. Everyone thinks it’s terrible and useless outside of its utility as a self-updating Rolodex, yet nothing can displace it.

    As for recruiters complaining about companies being ghosted by candidates, I can’t think of a better reason for justified unprofessionalism. Anyone who has ever looked for employment know that HR departments and head hunters have been ghosting candidates for decades. It’;s about time they had a taste of their own medicine.Report

    • Philip H in reply to John Puccio
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      says:

      Anyone who has ever looked for employment know that HR departments and head hunters have been ghosting candidates for decades. It’;s about time they had a taste of their own medicine.

      Here here.

      And sadly its not just a private sector phenomena – the federal government is atrocious about notifying candidates about outcomes of hiring actions – I still have jobs in my UASJobs.gov que listed as reviewing applicants when I have sat in more then one monthly meeting with the person hired.Report

      • John Puccio in reply to Philip H
        Ignored
        says:

        In the interview process, no news is almost always bad news. Whenever someone tells me they are going to follow up with a recruiter, I always tell them not to bother. If you are in the running, you will know. They will be in constant contact if they want you.

        To a certain extent, I get it. As practice, companies don’t want to eliminate back-up candidates before filling the seat. But a big part of it is also human nature. No one likes to be the bearer of bad news, so they just don’t do it – even with people who are not being seriously considered. That element is just cowardice, not to mention wildly inconsiderate.

        It’s ironic that recruiting is a function of Human Resources because candidates are viewed as commodities not people.Report

        • Philip H in reply to John Puccio
          Ignored
          says:

          Federal HR manuals actively forbid the hiring official from reaching out at any point in the process, and also forbid the HR “professionals” from updating status in any electronic form until the selected candidate has finally accepted an offer. What happens in practice though is the contractors performing this function in the federal agencies turn over annually (mostly do to high workload and low pay to preserve ridiculous profit margins) and the new comers assume all the notifications were made when the hire was completed. My department has traditionally made that worse by insisting there be separate contractors involved before and after hire.Report

        • Dark Matter in reply to John Puccio
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          says:

          We have a recruiter who manages the process. He has 200+ spots to fill. He’ll have 10k+ applications. Filling one spot might kill the prospects for hundreds, or even thousands of people.

          Depending on how far other people are in the process, he may not know whether he has a potential spot for you or what your odds are. Further he certainly doesn’t know if you’re going to pass final round interviews.

          A lot of this depends on how many levels of filtering you got past. If you meet the hiring manager, you’ll get a yes/no answer (which might be delayed while he interviews other people).

          If you meet me on the cattle call line where we’ll interview hundreds of people and don’t hear anything that day, then the answer is no.Report

          • John Puccio in reply to Dark Matter
            Ignored
            says:

            Yeah, you can forget about ever hearing anything by sending in a resume or an application. Any expectation of receiving something other than a form letter email would be ridiculous. The odds are that a live person won’t even see your resume. The algos are running the first phase of many searches.

            I was speaking in terms of people who are actually get through the black box and are engaged in an interview process. And in my circles, these are not “we need X amount of Y”. People in my field are usually up for one spot and one spot only. And they are ghosted all the time.Report

  4. Jaybird
    Ignored
    says:

    One of my former co-workers is, I assume, working for Team Evil. I don’t mean, like, law enforcement or anything like that, but he posts posts that are so aggressively bad that I can only imagine that he’s trying to get people to engage so that HR managers everywhere will say “Yep, this guy fell for the old ‘Someone On The Internet Is Wrong’ trick” when they visit LinkedIn and see him arguing against the position that it’s good for hiring managers to make potential candidates wait 10 hours for an interview originally scheduled for 9AM.Report

  5. Pinky
    Ignored
    says:

    That list of Ten Things is a little redundant, but it’s not a bad list. There are people who don’t know to do those things. And sure, you could take any of them to an extreme, but you’re far more likely to do damage to your employer and career by short-changing the items on that list. It’s sad to think that a list could inspire someone, but there are enough people who’ve really never been told these things that it could have an effect.Report

  6. Saul Degraw
    Ignored
    says:

    Some people stake their entire identity in their professional life. I find this depressingReport

  7. Oscar Gordon
    Ignored
    says:

    My Software Engineering prof held an “Ask Me Anything” session during one class, and someone asked him how to get noticed. He said adults use LinkedIn.

    Look for a company you want to work at, see who at the company you have a connection to, and message them through the site. Work the connection.

    So I have a former co-worker who got hired at a company. I brought up the company on LinkedIn, looked at who else was there, noticed there are quite a few former co-workers are there. I reached out, started some dialog. I have an interview on Thursday with one of the hiring managers. I haven’t filled out an application and I’m not even interested in going back to work until the end of August. They know that, they still want to talk to me now, because at least two people I know there have vouched for me already.Report

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