Thursday Throughput: Next Gen Vaccine Edition

Michael Siegel

Michael Siegel is an astronomer living in Pennsylvania. He blogs at his own site, and has written a novel.

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20 Responses

  1. Kristin Devine
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    says:

    Here’s an interesting article from the before times about a leaky vaccine that has caused some pretty serious long term consequences: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/science/tthis-chicken-vaccine-makes-virus-dangerousReport

  2. Michael Cain
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    says:

    ThTh1: Second sentence of the third paragraph seems to be missing a “not”.Report

  3. Michael Cain
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    says:

    ThTh4 and ThTh11: The bigger problem in the near future seems to me to be Russia taking away access to Soyuz rockets. Soyuz and SpaceX’s Falcon 9/Heavy are the real workhouse heavy lifters right now, and Soyuz is off the table for countries participating in the sanctions on Russia. Delta IV and Atlas V are effectively MD’ed and the remaining flights are booked. Ariane 6, Vulcan, and New Glenn have yet to fly and no one knows what their launch tempos will actually be. We already know SLS is going to be limited to a launch every year or two.

    I saw recently that one of the high-ups at SpaceX gently berated NASA in public, effectively saying, “You’ve bet your Artemis schedule on Starship, and then limited your thinking to a ton or two of payload per mission, not the 50-100 tons Starship can carry.”Report

  4. Oscar Gordon
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    says:

    ThTh13: There is an argument to be made about fertilizer over-use and improper use, such that run off becomes a serious problem. But a ban is killing a mouse with a cannon.Report

  5. Brandon Berg
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    says:

    I’ve been trying to post a comment on this thread, and it keeps getting blackholed. I don’t get the usual “Your comment is in moderation” link. There’s just nothing there. I did get a comment in the URL after posting: 3726514. I don’t know whether that helps. I’ve posted about four slightly different versions now, so if you only fish one out, I’d prefer that it be the second-newest one, with the ID above. I tried removing the link in the last version I submitted.Report

    • Jaybird in reply to Brandon Berg
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      says:

      I’m not seeing anything in there… I went down the first two pages of spam and didn’t see anything that wasn’t obvious spam.Report

    • Michael Cain in reply to Brandon Berg
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      says:

      I had one completely disappear this morning, so you’re not alone. Only thing that was unusual about it was that the embedded link had some special characters in it. And it’s WordPress, which sometimes does unexpected things. For a while this morning, the commenter-archive portion of State of the Discussion was suppressing a year’s worth of my comments, but has now returned to its normal behavior.Report

      • Brandon Berg in reply to Michael Cain
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        says:

        Oh, cool. I had no idea that State of the Discussion was back. I thought all that stuff was disabled to save resources.Report

        • Michael Cain in reply to Brandon Berg
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          says:

          It was. More web crawlers had discovered the site, and Bad Things happened when the crawlers started traversing the insane implicit tree of links SotD provides (multiple ways to get to every comment in the database). I’m sure I put up some sort of announcement about SotD being back after we solved that problem. Said solution being no more than warning the crawlers away from SotD. I check from time to time and somewhat to my surprise all of the many crawlers out there honor the warning. Guess I should do another little post about SotD.Report

  6. Jaybird
    Ignored
    says:

    ThTh13:

    “The humans we’ve been monitoring have discovered sculpture.”
    “Oh, good! Art is a very important development!”
    “They’re mostly making statues of naked humans.”
    “Oh.”
    (later)
    “The humans we’ve been monitoring have discovered pottery.”
    “Oh, good! Food storage is a very important development!”
    “They’re painting naked humans on the side of the pottery.”
    “Oh.”
    (later)
    “The humans we’ve been monitoring have figured out how to take photographs.”
    “Oh, good! That’s a huge step in mass communication!”
    “They’re taking pictures of naked humans.”
    “Oh.”
    (later)
    “The humans we’ve been monitoring have figured out how to broadcast on an interstellar basis.”
    “Oh, good! That’s a giant step on the way to actually figuring out how to talk to us! What are the first broadcasts?”
    “Naked pictures of themselves.”
    “Oh.”Report

    • Michael Cain in reply to Jaybird
      Ignored
      says:

      Long ago at Bell Labs I attended a talk by a renowned “psychology of communications” specialist. His general thesis was that broad acceptance of a new communications medium was always based initially on some form of sex or violence. When questioned by some of the audience about the telephone, his example was that early local telephony volume was driven by its use as a substitute for back-fence gossip, which invariably included who was sleeping with whom. Professional boxing and wrestling were immensely popular in the early days of over-the-air television. (College and professional football, both quite violent sports, continue to draw enormous audiences.) When video-on-demand service experiments started, it was widely known that cable providers hoped that they could break even on mainstream movies, but the content that actually supported the service was pornography.

      We have international readers here. I’d be interested in hearing what they think about their locales, and whether this is a US-centric phenomenon.Report

      • Mike Schilling in reply to Michael Cain
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        says:

        It’s a truism that what drover improvement in internet perfomance was porn. If we just wanted to exchange text message, it was fine in 1988.Report

        • Michael Cain in reply to Mike Schilling
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          says:

          I was beginning to be involved with image and video compression at the time. A surprising amount of work was driven by alt.sex.binaries.pictures, with subject lines that included “1 of 13”. And alt.sex.binaries.videos, with subject lines that included “1 of 137”.Report

          • Chip Daniels in reply to Michael Cain
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            says:

            Dear Ordinary Times readers-
            I never thought this would happen to me, but I just had to share it:

            In the early days of the internet, people persisted in aping the old customs of making everything into a hard copy.
            So like I knew a company where the secretary had to print out every email and file it away in a cabinet.

            So it wasn’t surprising that one guy got caught printing out Penthouse pictures to make his own skin magazine.Report

            • Michael Cain in reply to Chip Daniels
              Ignored
              says:

              Lena is the most often used test case in image compression. It’s cropped from a Playboy centerfold. Playboy was notorious for pursuing copyright infringement cases involving its models’ images. They decided to make an exception for Lena once they realized it had become a standard.

              Note: The image does actually satisfy all of the conditions to be a good test case.Report

            • fillyjonk in reply to Chip Daniels
              Ignored
              says:

              a few years ago, our campus Title IX admin gave a talk; one of the issues apparently then was guys e-mailing d*ck pics to women. Title IX guy said “in some circles, this is now how a guy asks for a date” (I don’t even want to know).

              Anyway, apparently the women (mostly students) would bring him printouts of said pictures as “evidence.” Apparently he kept them in a file cabinet just in case (for example, if the guy was a repeat offender).

              My stupid brain immediately went “some people have a junk drawer, he has an entire “junk” cabinet” and then I had to bite the inside of my mouth because laughing then would have been so, so inappropriate and I didn’t want to have to explain my intrusive thought.

              But yeah, those poor women, some of whom were still-fairly-innocent 17 and 18 year olds. I’ve never received that kind of “junk” mail and I hope I never do.Report

      • Kazzy in reply to Michael Cain
        Ignored
        says:

        Is it true that VHS beat Beta-Max despite inferior tech because porn was on VHS?Report

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