Weekend Plans Post: The Study Group

Jaybird

Jaybird is Birdmojo on Xbox Live and Jaybirdmojo on Playstation's network. He's been playing consoles since the Atari 2600 and it was Zork that taught him how to touch-type. If you've got a song for Wednesday, a commercial for Saturday, a recommendation for Tuesday, an essay for Monday, or, heck, just a handful a questions, fire off an email to AskJaybird-at-gmail.com

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13 Responses

  1. Brandon Berg
    Ignored
    says:

    I hate doing IT/operations work. I started my career at the tail end of a glorious era when software came in a box and developers could just write C code and not bother with containers or networking or hosts in the Singapore data center going down or any nonsense like that, and I want so, so badly to go back.

    On the other hand, we get more money now. That’s cool. If I had to choose, I guess I’d take the money. But I’d have to think about it.Report

    • Jaybird in reply to Brandon Berg
      Ignored
      says:

      I kinda enjoy the IT/operations work.

      I came up in the glorious days when there were entire teams of people doing jobs that are now two guys and a dozen scripts (and the second guy is only there to answer the phone when the first guy is sick).

      The old way was inefficient, I’m told.Report

    • Michael Cain in reply to Brandon Berg
      Ignored
      says:

      During the last few years of my technical career, one of my “jobs” was making life miserable for the IT network guys. Making their lives miserable wasn’t actually the goal, but some of the things I did were odd enough to break the network. There had originally been a physically separate network where I built small pieces of strange software, and some of the other researchers used that strange software, and occasionally Bad Things happened, but were localized. We were acquired and the new corporate network IT people lobbied to maintain that physically separate network, won the argument, and promptly converted it into a virtually separate network within their corporate network.

      Even after a lot of years, I remember standing in the back of a room where they were doing a presentation about a recent network failure and the speaker said, “We think Mike Cain was doing something over the weekend, and we have no idea how his packet storm got through all the firewalls and into the headquarters network.” Everyone in the room turned to look at me. It was a shame I wasn’t wearing my “Fools! I will destroy you all! (Ask me how.)” mad engineer shirt.Report

  2. Fish
    Ignored
    says:

    I was initially resentful (because like Bruce Banner, I’m always angry) about being made to get the cert, but I quickly discovered that I enjoyed building my own ESXi server (as my training platform) and going through all the exercises and practice tests and learning interesting and actually useful Linux things. The training was actual sys admin work, unlike most of the BS I’m required to do at work (DevOps and Agile–as my employer implements it–can suck it).

    But overall…I’m glad I got it, and I’m glad it’s over.Report

  3. fillyjonk
    Ignored
    says:

    Grading, and then probably hiding out in a figurative blanket fort (especially now I learned I can watch Community on Amazon Prime, including the epic blanket fort episode). This weekend is THE anniversary. I tried to read a bit of coverage of it and had to nope out because it’s too much. Most of my adult life (I was what, 32, in September 2001) has been a blur of Big Events That Are Unprecedented and also an increasing polarization and balkanization to the point where I wonder how I navigate this brave new world with whatever time I may have left.

    There are things I would LIKE to do, but the intersection of things I HAVE to do and the fact that the pandemic’s still raging here and the hospital’s half closed down (lack of staff) meaning if you’re in a car wreck you’re probably dead – so I won’t be doing the things I would LIKE, not for a while.Report

  4. Pinky
    Ignored
    says:

    Through most of covid, I’ve been watching more tv than movies. An adequate show will take up at least 22 hours; even a great movie only eats up 2. But I’ve been hitting movies harder the past few weeks.

    The trick is to mix up genres. If I watch a couple of action movies in a row, they blur, but drop a romantic comedy or a documentary between them and I’m good. Ditto sub-genres. I need about two months between martial arts movies, but I can digest two general action movies a week. What’s really striking me is that different eras a practically different genres. Something terrible happened to documentaries around the turn of the century; I suspect it has something to do with reality tv. Cinematography changed about 20 years ago as well. There are still some lush movies, but for the most part there’s a YouTube style that’s dominant today.

    It really seems like there’s a bigger difference between 1995 and today than between the earliest talkies and 1995. And hardly ever in a good way. Am I imagining this?Report

    • Jaybird in reply to Pinky
      Ignored
      says:

      I want to say that the changes you’ve seen can be blamed on a single book: Save The Cat! The Last Book on Screenwriting You’ll Ever Need.

      Granted, it came out in 2005 and not 1995, but check out the reviews.

      This book hammered out The Perfect Formula and, gosh darn it, it feels like every single movie script writer since 2006 or 2007 has read it too.Report

      • Pinky in reply to Jaybird
        Ignored
        says:

        That’s a lot of it.

        It’s all about the hero’s journey, man. See, Joseph Campbell analyzed all the legends in human history and discovered the hidden formula. There’s a hero, and bad stuff happens to him, and he reacts to it, and then even worse stuff happens and he has to overcome it. Oh, and travel somewhere bad.

        What’s odd to me is that I see a decline in really cheap horror movies, documentaries, and other genres that you wouldn’t expect to be affected.Report

        • Jaybird in reply to Pinky
          Ignored
          says:

          Without delving into religion, I want to say that some of the problems are a disjoint in culture.

          The movie Don’t Breathe, for example, was fairly well-received by test audiences but they overwhelmingly sided with the Unstoppable Force instead of the teenagers who had broken into his home. They had to do some reshoots to make the Unstoppable Force less sympathetic… when, a decade or two earlier, there would have been enough people in the office to have known “we’re going to have to put our thumb on the scale” without having to hear it from the test audience first.Report

  5. James K
    Ignored
    says:

    New Zealand (apart from Auckland) is back to Level 2, so I’ll be going back into the office part-time from next week. Also my gaming group can start meeting again (except for one of us, who is still working weekends right now due to COVID stuff), so we’ll be getting together to play board games tomorrow.Report

  6. InMD
    Ignored
    says:

    Certifications in areas you already work in can be a real b-i-t-c-h. I got my CIPP/US back in the spring. Now I’ve been in-house healthcare for about 11 years, and have all kinds of practical experience dealing with privacy, and not just HIPAA/HITECH, and approaching 7 in the information technology side of it. Other than company death level breaches, I’ve dealt with it.

    The problem is I have no formal training in the area other than my trusty JD and on the job experience. I also practice in jurisdictions with no CLEs, which is fine because these things are mostly BS anyway, so I don’t bother with classes.

    When I was studying and doing the classes for the cert it was either stuff so easy and obvious I couldn’t believe it was being tested (though even then I often knew where to find the answer, just didn’t memorize it), or a bunch of theory on the subject I’d never heard of and struck me as contrary to how things actually work. Thankfully I passed in 1 try but I was incredibly nervous that I wouldn’t. The shame of going back and telling my colleagues I needed to do it a second time would have killed me.Report

  7. Marchmaine
    Ignored
    says:

    Last weekend I broke the shear pin on the pto shaft to the Bush Hog… it has a slip clutch, so I didn’t really know you could do that.

    So this weekend I replaced the drive pin. Took the machine into the woods for the pre-fall path mowing. And promptly broke the shear pin again. Which I thought would be impossible to do twice.

    That means next weekend I have to do the slip clutch maintenance that no one ever does because if you break two shear pins in two weeks, you’re doin’ something wrong (like not doing the maintenance no one ever does).

    Fortunately the shear pins are about $3. Taking the slip clutch apart is about two hours and 31 f***ks and probably one wrench toss.Report

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