Linky Friday: Hot, Cold, and Lukewarm Mess Edition

Andrew Donaldson

Andrew Donaldson

Born and raised in West Virginia, Andrew has since lived and traveled around the world several times over. Though frequently writing about politics out of a sense of duty and love of country, most of the time he would prefer discussions on history, culture, occasionally nerding on aviation, and his amateur foodie tendencies. He can usually be found misspelling/misusing words on Twitter @four4thefire and his writing website Yonder and Home.

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28 Responses

  1. Avatar DensityDuck
    Ignored
    says:

    [LF1] whatever, you racist. you’re just a racist who wants an excuse to be racist and to laugh at racist things. there are plenty of non-racist things out there (and no it’s not my job to educate you about what those are, if you actually cared you’d go find them yourself) and it really says something that you’re trying so hard to keep racist things around and explain about how they aren’t really racist. if you think this is an extreme attitude it’s because you’re racist. anything you say other than “yes, ban the book” is racist.

    Compiled for comic effect, but not not how people are approaching this. Racism is the new secular sin, taking over from child molestation and open expression of religious belief. The former foundered on the rock of lack of anything that could be called evidence, and the latter couldn’t get over the hump of “it’s possible to genuinely be a good person doing good things and cite religious belief as your motivation for this”. But racism, well, there’s plenty of it — like, stereotypical depictions of nonwhite people — and it’s really hard to argue “but maybe it’s okay for there to be a little bit of racism…”Report

  2. Avatar Oscar Gordon
    Ignored
    says:

    LF5: Did I read that right, that 3 people refused to take a survey because people from a political party they dislike were also asked to take the survey?

    And I thought our politics were partisan…Report

  3. Avatar Jaybird
    Ignored
    says:

    What’s Gray Davis doing now? Like, I remember back in 2004, he got a job doing a commercial with Monster.com but then after that, he kinda disappeared.

    Wikipedia says that he’s doing corporate law with Loeb & Loeb.

    Good work, if you can get it. I guess.Report

  4. Avatar Chip Daniels
    Ignored
    says:

    LF1:
    Where is this world that Nicholas is living in, and do they speak English there?Report

  5. Avatar Swami
    Ignored
    says:

    So on LF7, Rand argues, that absent evidence to the contrary, vaccinations (or prior exposure to the disease) trump the need for masks. Fauci argues that new variants may arise which we do not have immunity to, thus we need to continue to wear masks, and that such a new variant may have already emerged in Africa.

    Seems that they both actually agree that reinfection or infection after vaccination of/for the current dominant virus is not a major threat. Seems reasonable to communicate that masks are not likely to be critical for those with immunity until or unless a new variant becomes prominent which bypasses the immunity. We would then watch to see if this new variant does or does not come to prominence.Report

  6. Avatar Pinky
    Ignored
    says:

    LF7: I don’t listen to Dr. Fauci often. I’m not saying I don’t trust him, but I just don’t listen to him speak. This clip maybe doubled the amount I’ve ever heard from him. I think this is one of those decisions, like not watching election night coverage, that has kept me clear of a lot of the dumber theories that are floating around out there. In this clip Dr. Fauci sounded like a dumb, sloganeering politician. I get that same dismissive New Yorker vibe that has served Trump and Cuomo so well in building lasting friendships.Report

    • Avatar Susara Blommetjie in reply to Pinky
      Ignored
      says:

      I really don’t understand how one could interpret Fauci’s words as dumb sloganeering. I see him trying to explain why Rand Paul was wrong. Paul interrupted him at least 3 times, and Fauci then refused to keep playing the game; he just gave up; stated that he disagreed and left the rest for people that actually knew what they are talking about. Because Paul doesn’t.

      Look at the South African numbers https://covid-19dashboard.news24.com/

      That second wave burnt through sommunities as if this had been a totally naive population. As if there had never been a first wave that had infected up to 60% of some communities.

      One thing should be understand very clearly: natural immunity acquired after infection with the original variant of covid-19 offers no – NO – protection against the South African variant. I have contact with people that work in South African hospitals. I personally know people that have seen the stats from South African medical insurance companies. The scale of reinfections they have seen is very clear; it’s not just a handful here and there.

      What Paul was saying about no studies being available is just. plain. wrong. But he had his agenda and was not there to hear facts. Who was grandstanding?Report

  7. Avatar Marchmaine
    Ignored
    says:

    [LF2] Contrarian thought for the day… Just as Trump failed to build a response/program for the Pandemic that would have highlighted the benefits of a ‘National Conservatism’ so too is Biden failing to showcase why a ‘National Healthcare’ response would be more like Medicare (which people like) and less like Medicaid (which they don’t) … the vaccine roll-out highlights the fundamental gap between National policy and actual delivery… and worse, emphasizes the things people fear about Nationalized medicine… bad technology, centralized decisions that say one thing but do another, the obvious politicization in the name of non-politicization, and just bad execution – of, if you prefer, executing at the exact level of Trump while claiming to do something better than Trump.

    Sure… it’s perfectly fine to say: We weren’t prepared for this, and we don’t have a National Healthcare program… if only we did. My point is, this is the opportunity to impress… to win converts. The pandemic (among other things sank Trump) it risks setting back National Healthcare support. That’s the trajectory… there’s maybe time to turn things around but if this is an audition/opportunity for a National Healthcare response, to paraphrase Rahm Emanuel, a crisis wasted.

    In the end, the heroes will be Capitalism, Big Pharma, Trumpian vs. EU Techocratic investments/control, and CVS/Non-Medical delivery systems. The *idea* that we’ll want an EU type system to deliver health-care? Whelp… put that dog down.Report

    • Avatar InMD in reply to Marchmaine
      Ignored
      says:

      The only place I think you’re wrong is on the Trumpian v. EU style approach. Now the EU style has profoundly discredited itself but there’s no Trumpian triumph here. The fact that he couldn’t even come close to playing a replacement level politician for 5 minutes last Spring is probably the only reason he is no longer president.

      So yes, big wins for Pharma and American style retail delivery but I don’t think anyone can claim victory on their vision for ‘what healthcare should look like in America.’ The progressive vision showed its cracks and Trump’s performance on top of failure to ‘repeal and replace’ showed the GOP has no vision for it at all.Report

      • Avatar Marchmaine in reply to InMD
        Ignored
        says:

        Eh, Trump bought 100M doses of Pfizer and Moderna … two totally unproven and new technologies… without care for cost (hey, it’s other people’s money)… or, really, safety. That’s Trumpian.

        August 11, 2020
        “The U.S. government has agreed to buy 100 million doses of Moderna’s experimental coronavirus vaccine for $1.5 billion, or $15 per dose.

        Why it matters: The Trump administration, through Operation Warp Speed, has now bought initial batches of vaccines from Moderna, GlaxoSmithKline and Sanofi, Pfizer, Novavax, Johnson & Johnson and AstraZeneca before knowing whether they are safe and effective. The federal government also appears to own some of the patent rights associated with Moderna’s vaccine.”

        On lots of levels, that’s just stupid… and had it gone differently, so obviously Trumpian we’d be adding it to the list of things Trumpianly stupid.Report

        • Avatar InMD in reply to Marchmaine
          Ignored
          says:

          Ehhhh I hear the argument and I know the counter-factual game is fraught but I just struggle to see that playing out in a materially different way, even under hypothetical HRC admin.

          I am willing to accept he made the right call. But like with the other handful of things where I think we got the right outcome I see a random shot that happened to hit not a win born from strategy. There’s no new paradigm on the table.Report

          • Avatar Marchmaine in reply to InMD
            Ignored
            says:

            I’m fine with Replacement-Level-Theory… if even Trump can deliver replacement level results… and Biden’s 100M vaccinations in 100 days is literally the run-rate of Replacement-level-Trump on the day he took office. Then agreed… what’s there to replace?Report

            • Avatar InMD in reply to Marchmaine
              Ignored
              says:

              Maybe we’re starting to talk passed each other? Even if I concede the up front vaccine purchase as a win (which I can grudgingly do) I don’t think that adds up to an aggregate replacement value given the chaos he helped sew last Spring. Not to mention failure pre-covid to move the general ball forward on healthcare in any way, something Congressional Republicans also bear responsibility for.

              But let’s just say he is replacement value. Going back to your first comment I don’t see how that is a win for an alternative vision of healthcare. Unless ‘status quo’ plus (generously) some hits and misses in a once a century crisis is the alternative vision, which I really don’t think it is.Report

              • Avatar Marchmaine in reply to InMD
                Ignored
                says:

                I think we are… I’m saying that Trump squandered an oppty for National Conservatism *and* Biden is squandering an oppty to make a case for a stronger National Health program.

                Though, I suppose its possible to say that Biden isn’t interested in Medicare for All or some such. In which case, fine, he’s just running downhill on this whole Covid thing and indifferent to the oppty. In which case, similar to Trump, his indifference to things others in his party might care about is the thing squandered.Report

              • Avatar InMD in reply to Marchmaine
                Ignored
                says:

                We both know that eventually Biden will believe what he is told to believe. My guess is that if you asked him without being coached he’d say he supported something like ACA with mandate and public option.

                But I think it’s TBD whether he can make the case for anything groundbreaking. I suspect if he moves the ball at all on healthcare it will only be in small ways and on the margins.Report

              • Avatar Michael Cain in reply to Marchmaine
                Ignored
                says:

                I suspect Biden has a list of things. Some can be done by executive order, and he’s issuing those. Some can be done by rule making, and he seems to be appointing people who will be competent at that. Some can be done picking and choosing cases and the side of the case to be on by the DOJ, and that’s happening. Some can be done through reconciliation and he’s passed the Covid stimulus and will likely pass an infrastructure bill that way. The rest, though, he needs Congress and the Senate in particular. He seems to realize that he’s 12 years away from actually being there, and is letting Schumer lead.

                If through some bizarre circumstance I were jammed into the Presidency, it’s how I would proceed.Report

    • Avatar Chip Daniels in reply to Marchmaine
      Ignored
      says:

      It’s difficult for me to get a grasp of this, since the argument is framed in terms of third hand opinions, that is, “Here’s how other people are viewing it and here’s how they will respond”.

      Is there any support for this, that some large group of people are actually viewing the Biden Administration this way, or that they are responding like this?Report

    • Avatar Kolohe in reply to Marchmaine
      Ignored
      says:

      Is it ‘people’ that don’t like Medicaid, or is it ‘state governments’ that don’t like Medicaid mandates, because it represents an open enduring & growing budget obligation that they can’t just go into debt to cover down on?

      (also, it’s probably not accurate to say that all EU health care delivery and payment systems are identical i.e. not anything is actually like the UK NHS, afaik. And even in Canada, the health care system is mostly provincially, not nationally, run.

      Though this is something in favor of your view in that the impression is more dominant than the reality, so it may not matter)Report

      • Avatar Jaybird in reply to Kolohe
        Ignored
        says:

        xor vs andReport

      • Avatar InMD in reply to Kolohe
        Ignored
        says:

        The operative question isn’t ‘who is paying’ it’s what has HHS and the sub-agencies done to prove they deserve way more power and control over Americans’ healthcare? I’m always open to persuasion but I see a resounding ‘not much.’ And this was a big opportunity for them.Report

      • Avatar Marchmaine in reply to Kolohe
        Ignored
        says:

        I see, that’s a throw-away for what I take to be a self-apparent train of thought: Most everyone assumes that Medicare for all will be Medicare quality – which might be sellable to the 156M Americans who have Employer Insurance. And, it sounds like a possible upgrade to the 75M who have Medicaide.

        But… if the proposal were to change from Medicare for all to Medicaid for All… or worse, VA for All… then you see support plummet.

        Right now our Pandemic experience feels like a VA experience… the goal is to upgrade it to a Medicare experience.Report

  8. Avatar Ozzzy!
    Ignored
    says:

    #1:

    I think the internet / connectivity explosion has provided people with a plethora of plethoras of views, religions, mindsets, hurts, wants…it is really amazing. The counter swing is always to the ‘those are bad things! Stop this!’ and we can see this cycle, sped up, over the generations if not the centuries. I think we will all be fine, as long as the good folks here keep sniping each other about HSR.Report

  9. Avatar Peter Moore
    Ignored
    says:

    [LF2] “which erroneously forecast millions of non-nursing home Covid deaths in the U.S”. If that is his opening point, that the rest is very likely not worth reading.

    This has been a popular gross mischaracterization from COVID deniers for almost a year. The actual study said: “In total, in an unmitigated epidemic, we would predict approximately 510,000 deaths in GB and 2.2 million in the
    US, not accounting for the potential negative effects of health systems being overwhelmed on mortality.”

    (https://spiral.imperial.ac.uk/bitstream/10044/1/77482/14/2020-03-16-COVID19-Report-9.pdf)Report

    • Avatar Mike Schilling in reply to Peter Moore
      Ignored
      says:

      Remember when ICUs were at 100% of capacity? I do. You might too. DeSantis obviously wasn’t paying attention.

      During the first week in January [2021[, Central Florida’s two main hospitals filled 96 percent of their intensive care unit beds and at least two smaller hospitals reached 100 percent of ICU capacity as COVID-19 hospitalizations surged, according to newly released data.

      Report

  10. Avatar Marchmaine
    Ignored
    says:

    But we have 100s of Millions of doses of a Miracle Vaccine that the EU could have had, but doesn’t.

    We even have 10’s of Millions of the AZ vaccine that is working wonders in the UK!

    BUT… we aren’t using the PANDEMIC as a reason to change how FDA/CDC/etc. approve Miracle Drugs that are doing miracles in the UK.

    So… if the goal is to use the crisis to further a policy objective of more National Leadership in Healthcare… then show that change is better than Day-to-Day.

    I mean, I don’t think we’re really disagreeing… just that if you write it out, it looks pretty obvious that we’re just going to do the same-old-same-old and try to spin this as some sort of Biden policy win… but then wonder why people don’t really credit ‘The Win’ the way we think they ought to. Especially when it gets trotted out as ‘remember how we beat Covid… this is why we need National Healthcare’Report

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