Myanmar Coup

Andrew Donaldson

Born and raised in West Virginia, Andrew has since lived and traveled around the world several times over. Though frequently writing about politics out of a sense of duty and love of country, most of the time he would prefer discussions on history, culture, occasionally nerding on aviation, and his amateur foodie tendencies. He can usually be found misspelling/misusing words on Twitter @four4thefire and his writing website Yonder and Home.

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8 Responses

  1. Damon
    Ignored
    says:

    “Massive voting irregularities”. HmmReport

  2. Chip Daniels
    Ignored
    says:

    Somewhere in Palm Beach, a fat old man is burning with envy.Report

  3. CJColucci
    Ignored
    says:

    That’s how it’s done.Report

  4. Saul Degraw
    Ignored
    says:

    I think we have to take the idea that this is a one-year state of emergency with a heavy grain of salt. The Myanmar military only handed over power to civilians reluctantly after decades of pressure and did so reluctantly. This is not the first time, they suffered poorly at the ballot box and refuse to abide by the results. I read yesterday that they drafted the Constitution to ensure they get at least 25 percent of the seats in Parliament and make it impossible for Aung San Suu Kyi, to be prime minister. The role of State Councilor needed to be created for her.Report

  5. Stillwater
    Ignored
    says:

    “What do they plan to do in the year they have given themselves to run the country?”

    Get up early in the morning, work hard every day (lots of meetings and calls), and give themselves another year to run the country.Report

  6. InMD
    Ignored
    says:

    I know she’s a darling of the West but I’m not sure how much anger we’re supposed to muster over this. Hasn’t she been running interference for ethnically cleansing Myanmar of its Muslim minority?Report

    • Murali in reply to InMD
      Ignored
      says:

      Here’s what we should say

      1. The civilian government of Myanmar is not morally legitimate (at least not insofar as they are responsible for and complicit in the Rohingya genoicde). It follows that a coup against them would not have been ipso facto wrong.

      2. The apparent significant civilian participation in this genocide suggests that Aung San Suu Kyi’s popularity is in part grounded in her allowing it to go on. The democratic popularity of her government should not count against the case for overthrowing it.

      3. That said, the military would have carried out the coup regardless of the civilian government’s complicity in the genocide. This is apparent from their own complicity in said genocide and from their stated reasons for the coup: voter fraud anyone? While the coup was not wrong per se, the junta demonstrated a clear lack of virtue. They acted for clearly bad reasons and motives. They are thus deserving of condemnation and opprobrium.Report

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