Sunday Morning! “White Tears” & “Red Pill” by Hari Kunzru

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Rufus F.

Rufus is an American curmudgeon in Canada. He has a PhD in History, sings in a garage rock band, and does many things. He is the author of the forthcoming book "The Paris Bureau" from Dio Press (early 2021).

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6 Responses

  1. Avatar Rufus F.
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    says:

    Really? No one’s read this guy? He’s pretty good. I only just recently heard of him due to the attention Red Pill’s been getting, but I’d be keen to read more.Report

  2. Avatar LeeEsq
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    says:

    I didn’t read White Noise but it seems to go against the Elijah Wald argument that American popular music is a lot more complicated than white artists make black music acceptable because African-Americans like Guy Lomabardi too.Report

    • Avatar Rufus F. in reply to LeeEsq
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      I’d agree with that, but it’s not really making the first argument. It’s really more about the appeal of “authenticity” for sheltered young people. I got the feeling it could just as easily have been vintage country music or rockabilly.Report

      • Avatar LeeEsq in reply to Rufus F.
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        says:

        Authenticity is a comparatively recent value in pop music though. It dates from the late 60s, when rock music transformed from dance music to art music you listen too and other stuff. Before the late 1960s, nobody really cared that much about whether you were authentic or not. Outside rock and hip-hop it doesn’t really matter that much either. Without the critics re-writing musical history to suit their tastes, few people would care about authenticity. We might even have earlier and more white hip=hop artists.Report

        • Avatar Slade the Leveller in reply to LeeEsq
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          says:

          Blame Sgt. Pepper and Pet Sounds for that.Report

        • Avatar Rufus F. in reply to LeeEsq
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          says:

          Right. This is also when field recordings of blues and folk music became a thing, probably for similar reasons. It reminds me of an amusing clip from the 60s in which Marshall McLuhan is lightheartedly grilling his college students on why they’re dressed in the clothes of “farmers,” since they’re mostly suburban college kids.Report

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