Purple Haze: Bipartisan, Nationwide Wins for Drug Ballot Initiatives

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Andrew Donaldson

Born and raised in West Virginia, Andrew has since lived and traveled around the world several times over. Though frequently writing about politics out of a sense of duty and love of country, most of the time he would prefer discussions on history, culture, occasionally nerding on aviation, and his amateur foodie tendencies. He can usually be found misspelling/misusing words on Twitter @four4thefire and his writing website Yonderandhome.com

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12 Responses

  1. Avatar Kristin Devine
    Ignored
    says:

    Legalizing drugs will do more to solve the issue of police overreach than anything, IMO.

    Repealing drug laws have wide bipartisan support in rural areas and that a writer at Reason was surprised by it passing in South Dakota just means they need to get out more.Report

  2. Avatar Jaybird
    Ignored
    says:

    There’s an essay bubbling in the back of my head about The Authoritarian Left not liking marijuana’s harmful effects for society.

    Specifically: The temporary shushing of the Superego.Report

    • Avatar Philip H in reply to Jaybird
      Ignored
      says:

      Once they find out how much “free” tax money could be had for “socialism” they usually become big fans.Report

      • Avatar Jaybird in reply to Philip H
        Ignored
        says:

        Sure, the 10% or whatever surtax on the quarter-ounce is sweet on the tongue…

        But having a bunch of people out there looking at speeches and snickering that “dude, she doesn’t know that she’s in a play and that we’re in the audience” when they’re watching a speech is not a good foundation upon which to build consensus buttressed by Socially Constructed Concepts.Report

  3. Avatar Oscar Gordon
    Ignored
    says:

    At this rate, the only way the feds will be involved in MJ busts is stopping the bales at the border.Report

    • Avatar Jaybird in reply to Oscar Gordon
      Ignored
      says:

      I read reports like this one and I always get confused:

      Marijuana arrests in the U.S. declined in 2019 for the first time in four years, a new federal report shows.

      While many expected the state-level legalization movement to reduce cannabis arrests as more markets went online, that wasn’t the case in 2016, 2017 or 2018, which each saw slight upticks in marijuana busts year-over-year. But last year there was a notable dip, the data published this week shows.

      There were a total of 545,601 marijuana arrests in 2019—representing 35 percent of all drug arrests—according to FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting program. That’s down from 663,367 the prior year and 659,700 in 2017.

      Report

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