X-Wing Miniatures Isn’t Just a Game, Its a Community

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Benjamin Espen

Ben is a medical devices engineer who has lived in Arizona almost his whole life. He has a website and can be found on Twitter.

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16 Responses

  1. Avatar Kristin Devine
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    says:

    Interesting! Never heard of this before!Report

  2. Avatar James K
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    says:

    I think X-Wing has done a lot for improving accessibility of tabletop wargames. Since it doesn’t have the painting and modelling requirements of a regular wargame, it’s a great gateway into the hobby.Report

  3. Derek Edwards Derek Edwards
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    says:

    I’ve played this several times; it’s one of those complex game my friend is into that I mentioned in my piece. I think it’s a fun game, though it’s not for me, mostly because it seems to be bought piece-meal. I can see how people could get really into it, though.Report

  4. Avatar Jaybird
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    says:

    The “Crazy People” dynamic is one that more games should learn how to lean into. There are a lot of people out there who like any given game but it’s the Crazy People who figure out the improvements that others can then go on to Ctrl-C/Ctrl-V.

    For the game itself, I’m looking at the ships and wondering if they’re hero-clicky.Report

    • Avatar jason in reply to Jaybird
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      says:

      I’m not sure what you mean by hero-clicky, but ships have either named pilots (characters from the movies or extended universe) or generic pilots (like “Red Squadron Ace”). The named pilots have an ability which usually revolves around action economy or maneuver options or attack options. Additionally, you can provide upgrades to ships based on their available upgrade slots. This is governed by a point scale: ships cost points, upgrades cost points, and most matches are set at 200 points. There’s also a “hyperspace” mode which is limited in available ships, upgrades, and even pilots and frequently adjusted by FFG for balance. Each ship comes with multiple pilot options, which are represented by ship cards and cardboard inserts you place into the plastic base.Report

      • Avatar Jaybird in reply to jason
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        says:

        Star Trek Fleet Captains uses the Heroclix model.

        This tells me that, nope, this ain’t anywhere *NEAR* Heroclix.Report

        • Avatar Benjamin Espen in reply to Jaybird
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          says:

          What does “hero-clicky” mean in this context? I’m not familiar with the mechanics of that game.Report

          • Avatar Jaybird in reply to Benjamin Espen
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            says:

            Heroclix has the stats of each ship on the bottom of the stand. You turn the wheel to determine the posture of your ship. If you’re going to be scanning, for example, you turn the clicky wheel at the bottom of the stand to the one with the high scan number (which has much, much lower numbers for movement rate, offense, and shields). If you are, instead, moving, you turn the wheel to the one with higher speed (but lower everything else).

            And when the ship takes damage, there are yellow stats that have either “maybe stay and fight, you can still win this” or “GET THE HECK OUT OF THERE” stats on them.

            And there’s one last grouping of red stats. Suitable mostly for limping into dock for repairs.

            That’s just Star Trek. They have superhero ones (hence the name) and pro wrestling ones and the Hobbit and Street Fighter and all that stuff. They’re “Collectible”.

            But the mechanic is pretty clever.Report

    • Avatar DensityDuck in reply to Jaybird
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      says:

      The boxes have clear fronts and you know exactly what ships you’re getting; there aren’t “chase figures” or rare units with boosted stats. While there are improved versions of some ships (and, as jason points out, packs you can buy with ace pilots and such) those are also obvious and you know what you’re getting (and the game tries to balance those, so someone can’t just buy a full squadron of Jedi and plaster the dudes who can only afford TIE fighters with jabroni pilots.)Report

      • Avatar Benjamin Espen in reply to DensityDuck
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        says:

        This is very much one of my favorite parts of the game. You don’t have any randomness in what you buy. I was used to Magic, where a rare card can be truly pricey, but also game winning if you can afford it.

        In the last edition of X-Wing, there were a few cards that were only sold with specific ships that were pretty good. If you wanted the upgrade card, you bought the ship, even if you didn’t want the ship. The most expensive of those cards topped out at $20 on eBay. Which is pretty different than Magic. However, FFG heard the cries of its customers, and now every upgrade is available with multiple ships.Report

  5. Avatar jason
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    says:

    I’ve been playing for about five years. It’s a fun game, and like James said above, a gateway into gaming. The community is mostly cool as well, even the try hards aren’t too annoying. Like Ackbar says, “it’s a trap.” You start off with a few ships, but soon have an impressive collection. For 2.0, I haven’t bought into all the factions and probably won’t. But it’s good entertainment that isn’t looking at a screen. Many of my local group bought into Star Wars Legion (basically a Star Wars army men game), and I bit the bullet and started playing it. We just had a big tourney yesterday; I lost epically, but still had a blast playing. I’m better at X-wing, but it’s also a game that’s fun even when you lose. And the community has so many resources for learning to play, and most players are willing to give advice to newer players, too.Report

  1. March 9, 2020

    […] “Theory crafting” has become an entire enterprise, mostly for computer games1. But many tabletop games are also immersive. From Dungeon and Dragons to Catan, you can find something as sophisticated and […]Report

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