The Perspective of Luck, or Lack Thereof

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Andrew Donaldson

Born and raised in West Virginia, Andrew has since lived and traveled around the world several times over. Though frequently writing about politics out of a sense of duty and love of country, most of the time he would prefer discussions on history, culture, occasionally nerding on aviation, and his amateur foodie tendencies. He can usually be found misspelling/misusing words on Twitter @four4thefire.

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64 Responses

  1. Avatar jason
    Ignored
    says:

    “Sports and politics have that in common. People absolutely lose their minds over it, and their basic life skills and humanity tend to go with it, all under the guise and excuse of “well, they are just passionate.””

    Yes. This.
    This is a great post. The booing at the game was disgraceful.Report

  2. Avatar DensityDuck
    Ignored
    says:

    Well. Luck has made his millions, and hopefully he was well-advised enough that he can keep them and doesn’t end up as a door greeter in Vegas, and if he physically can’t keep going then there’s no use expecting him to.

    But. “They don’t owe YOU anything”, sure, but we don’t owe them anything either, and Luck’s millions of dollars only happened because people came out to watch him throw the ball. Like these aren’t pick-up games and some dudes happened to stop by and watch, this is something where we agree to pay nine dollars for a Bud Light and they agree to do a good job throwing the ball, and when players act like that doesn’t matter it’s worth commenting.

    It wouldn’t even have been that hard, have him dress and sit on the sidelines (it’s a preseason game so that won’t even look bad), put him on the field for the last few series, then make the announcement in the press conference afterwards. Make it seem like you give a shit about the appearance of the thing, the ceremony, rather than showing up on the sideline in sweats and sneaking off.

    I mean, when you get to the pro level, it’s as much Pro Wrestling as it is the sport itself. Particularly when pretty soon the defense is gonna be drones and all football will be touch football.Report

    • Avatar JS in reply to DensityDuck
      Ignored
      says:

      “But. “They don’t owe YOU anything”, sure, but we don’t owe them anything either, and Luck’s millions of dollars only happened because people came out to watch him throw the ball”

      Yes. There were past transactions. You paid money, he played. He no longer wants to pay, and luckily he’s not demanding more money.

      So why should he sit on the sidelines or play performing monkey? Did you prepay? Was there a contract for future performance? Is there some reason he’s not allowed to, effectively, say “I’m not renewing this contract” and walk away — or why people would feel somehow cheated about it?

      Again, the rhetoric here is that he owes something to someone. What does he owe? How does he owe it? I mean I get that people might prefer he do something different, but what’s the justification for getting salty over it?Report

      • Avatar DensityDuck in reply to JS
        Ignored
        says:

        “There were past transactions. You paid money, he played.”

        Well. “I ain’t owe you SHIT dogg, you already done WATCHED me play” is certainly justifiable from a utilitarian perspective, but it does make the people who bought season tickets every year wonder if maybe next year they wouldn’t rather buy a boat and read about the games in the paper on Monday.

        “Did you prepay?”

        People who bought season tickets sure did, along with all those advertisers who signed contracts to pay millions of dollars to have their names prominently displayed in the stadium of a team whose star quarterback just quit.Report

        • Avatar Chip Daniels in reply to DensityDuck
          Ignored
          says:

          I think it’s interesting how the ire here is directed, not at the party who formed the contract with the ticketholders (the stadium or team management) but at the player, with whom no one but management formed a contract with.

          If I go to see a play and the lead actor is sick, I’m sure there is something written on the back of the ticket to the effect that management reserves the right to put in an understudy in lieu of the star I came to see. I never made any agreement with the star, but the playhouse.

          But more than this- there is an undercurrent of anger that the player is treating this like a mercenary transaction, instead of some moral duty to work, and this I see as a recurring pattern in how we as a society talk about labor and work.

          In one breath, we assert that work is simply a transaction, buying and selling of labor.
          Yet when the laborer balks at the terms and refuses to deliver the labor, somehow that is seen as distasteful, immoral somehow.

          We never take that attitude with the other side of the bargain. When a stadium refuses to give us a ticket unless we pay more, mostly people shrug and accept it. Yet why do people become so offended when laborers actually treat their labor as a commodity?Report

          • Avatar DensityDuck in reply to Chip Daniels
            Ignored
            says:

            “If I go to see a play and the lead actor is sick, I’m sure there is something written on the back of the ticket to the effect that management reserves the right to put in an understudy in lieu of the star I came to see.”

            you need to extend that metaphor a bit, something more like the lead actor quitting the production halfway through the final dress rehearsal after the city is covered with posters prominently featuring their name and face

            “there is an undercurrent of anger that the player is treating this like a mercenary transaction, instead of some moral duty to work”

            the undercurrent of anger is from the people who saw a great deal of money (both private ticket sales and tax receipts) go to this team as an organization and to Andrew Luck specifically, and they accepted it because they looked forward to seeing a team play football reasonably well, and now he’s walking out on that without (so far as we’ve heard) negotiating a graceful exit or even addressing that so much of the money happened because of him.Report

            • Avatar Chip Daniels in reply to DensityDuck
              Ignored
              says:

              Right, and so why is the anger directed at the employee and not at the management?

              I mean, you never had any sort of agreement with Luck, but you did with the management, and it seems like they are reneging on their promise.

              So why do they escape the anger?

              They could have certainly managed the team differently, taken more care to prevent his injuries, or been more explicit with the fans about the fickle unpredictable nature of the transaction.Report

              • Avatar DensityDuck in reply to Chip Daniels
                Ignored
                says:

                “why do they escape the anger?”

                It’s…not the management that walked off the field, or told Luck to do it.

                I mean, if you want to say “they should be angry with more people than just Andrew Luck” sure, I’ll agree to that, but the thrust of the post (and commentors) is that the anger is totally unjustified, like it’s some kind of “fan entitlement” to expect the guy making millions of dollars because people want to watch him throw a ball to make a show of respect when he decides he’s done with ball-throwing.Report

              • Avatar Chip Daniels in reply to DensityDuck
                Ignored
                says:

                OK, but this is what I am referring to when we talk about labor, like it should have some other dimension to it besides just a mercenary transaction.

                Which I’m fine with, by the way!

                I think the sooner we acknowledge that labor can never be just a commodity, the better.Report

              • Avatar JS in reply to DensityDuck
                Ignored
                says:

                “It’s…not the management that walked off the field, or told Luck to do it.”

                No, they just negotiated a contract with Luck that allowed it. The anger is totally unjustified. He’s a man, doing a job, who quit his job.

                You don’t throw a fit when a guy quits Home Depot. You don’t throw a fit if, say, your favorite actor or singer decides to hang up the hat.

                You spell out how unjustified it is in your defense about how it isn’t — you say “to expect the guy making millions of dollars because people want to watch him throw a ball to make a show of respect when he decides he’s done with ball-throwing.”

                Why? You paid, he performed. Why do you expect he owes you something beyond that? You didn’t buy his life. You bought tickets to see the team he was on play, but you seem to think that he’s been paid so much that he shouldn’t be ALLOWED to stop being the dancing monkey until the fans decide.

                You paid team to watch team. Team paid him, one of many, to play for them. He played and got his salary. He then quit. You can still watch the team.

                And yet you seem angry that he was allowed to quit. At the utter gall of the man, to decide he was done playing. Like it was HIS choice or something.Report

              • Avatar DensityDuck in reply to JS
                Ignored
                says:

                “You don’t throw a fit when a guy quits Home Depot.”

                lol

                “Andrew Luck is no more meaningful to the Colts than some random dude is to Home Depot” is a quite a take

                “Why do you expect he owes you something beyond that?”

                if Andrew Luck were as inconsequential and useless as you describe then why did they pay him so much money

                “you seem angry that he was allowed to quit”

                i get that you’re stanning for your sports daddy and that’s fine, I’m not here to kinkshame, but at no point in any of my posts have I suggested that he shouldn’t have been “allowed” to quitReport

              • Avatar JS in reply to DensityDuck
                Ignored
                says:

                “if Andrew Luck were as inconsequential and useless as you describe then why did they pay him so much money”

                Do you get into a snit when the CEO of a fortune 500 company quits his job?

                ” but at no point in any of my posts have I suggested that he shouldn’t have been “allowed” to quit”

                Oh, you’ve been quite open that he should be allowed to quit. You just think it’s in poor taste or insulting or something because he “owes” something to people.

                But you can’t specify what, except some nebulous “We paid good money” crap. You paid good money to his team, which paid him good money to play. He’s no longer playing, so he’s no longer getting paid, which means your whinging about how much he’s made is absolutely immaterial.

                You paid, he played. He quit, you’re not being billed. He owes the fans nothing, and hey — they don’t owe him anything.

                So why are you whining?Report

              • Avatar The question in reply to DensityDuck
                Ignored
                says:

                I mean to literally be the worst version of myself the colts training staff has made luck worse over the last 4 years so anybody expecting them to suddenly get better and put good product on the field is a moronReport

              • Avatar Michael Cain in reply to Chip Daniels
                Ignored
                says:

                Right, and so why is the anger directed at the employee and not at the management?

                If this morning’s CBS story is accurate, one of two announcements had to be made over the weekend. Either the team announcing they had placed him on injured reserve (out until at least week 6 of the season), or Luck saying he had retired. The story says management offered Luck the choice.

                The IR thing would no doubt have been better received by the fans than the retirement was. OTOH, it would have meant the team would have to count Luck against the salary cap and use one of the scarce IR slots. If everyone thought Luck was out for the season, the team made him a pretty generous offer.Report

    • Avatar Michael Cain in reply to DensityDuck
      Ignored
      says:

      It wouldn’t even have been that hard, have him dress and sit on the sidelines (it’s a preseason game so that won’t even look bad), put him on the field for the last few series, then make the announcement in the press conference afterwards.

      If what I have read is accurate, his leg was already at the point where they wouldn’t allow him on the practice field where QBs wear red jerseys and aren’t hit at all. If true, putting him on the field for live action, even in the preseason, would have been out of the question. CBS is reporting this morning that the team offered him the opportunity of going on injured reserve — wouldn’t be allowed to play until week 8 — rather than retiring, to see if perhaps the leg would get better, and Luck made the decision.Report

      • Avatar DensityDuck in reply to Michael Cain
        Ignored
        says:

        I can certainly understand the guy being too hurt to play, because those dudes get whaled on, but it suggests a certain…lack of concern to wait until after everyone’s bought their season tickets to announce it, and to show up in sweats instead of acting like you actually wanted to play.Report

        • Avatar CJColucci in reply to DensityDuck
          Ignored
          says:

          What did Luck actually know before the fans bought season tickets (or the team set up its draft board) that he should have made a decision about? If he knew then that he couldn’t play, he would have said so. If he is anything like the competitor his entire football life suggests he is, he kept trying to get well and play. It became too much. That it didn’t become apparent that his efforts would be futile until an inconvenient time is not his fault.Report

        • Avatar JS in reply to DensityDuck
          Ignored
          says:

          >to wait until after everyone’s bought their season tickets

          Season tickets for what? To see Luck? Did they buy “Luck Season tickets”.

          I thought they bought season tickets to see the team play. I didn’t realize that with Luck retiring, the whole team was being shuttered.Report

          • Avatar Michael Cain in reply to JS
            Ignored
            says:

            A bit of Google research says that before the 2017 season that Luck sat out following shoulder surgery (except for two weeks of practice in October), management kept dropping hints that he would be ready to play and sent him out on publicity appearances. Reportedly, there was at least one e-mail from Luck to a friend that said something like, “I’m nowhere near ready to go. I’m just out here to sell tickets.” There were at least threats of a lawsuit by season ticket purchasers.

            So, yeah, some number of them were only interested in buying Andrew Luck season tickets.Report

            • Avatar JS in reply to Michael Cain
              Ignored
              says:

              >So, yeah, some number of them were only interested in buying Andrew Luck season tickets.

              Then they are morons whose whining I find even more pathetic, something I didn’t think was possible.

              Although I would have found the lawsuit’s inevitable outcome hilarious, as what they bought were Colts season tickets, and not Luck season tickets.Report

              • Avatar Kazzy in reply to JS
                Ignored
                says:

                There is probably a point though at which they may veer into false advertising. If they KNOW he isn’t playing but they say, “COME WATCH ANDREW LUCK AND THE COLTS!” they’ll selling a false bill of goods.Report

              • Avatar JS in reply to Kazzy
                Ignored
                says:

                I suspect a judge would laugh them out of court.

                They’re Colts season tickets, not “Luck” season tickets. You can’t claim a false bill of goods unless the Colts aren’t the team playing. Sure, they might be parading around their top ranking player — but he’s not the team, the team isn’t him, and the tickets are clearly “Colts versus X, Date Y”, and the very nature of football means star talents get injured often enough that there most certainly is no expectation that any given future game will see a specific team lineup, nor could any reasonable adult believe that was the case.

                I mean what is their actual damage? Devaluation of the value of the tickets because Luck quit? You could sue any time someone gets hurt enough to be out the rest of the season under that logic.Report

        • Avatar jason in reply to DensityDuck
          Ignored
          says:

          And I don’t know about Indy’s season tickets, but you have to be on a waiting list for YEARS to get season tickets in Denver. People just don’t decide to buy season tickets on a whim. Or maybe they do in Indy.Report

    • Avatar Mike Schilling in reply to DensityDuck
      Ignored
      says:

      He can’t go on the field for the last few series, because he’s injured. That’s kind of the point.Report

  3. Avatar KenB
    Ignored
    says:

    I’m largely in agreement with this, but I think there would have been somewhat less pushback if he had come to this realization a few months ago, rather than just a couple weeks before the regular season starts.Report

    • Avatar DensityDuck in reply to KenB
      Ignored
      says:

      Yeah, I think that’s what’s getting everybody on this one. “It’s just sports, it’s just a luxury good” sure, but aren’t luxury goods what make life worth living? Don’t we have an expectation that the goods we purchase will be well-made, competently presented, and enjoyable?Report

      • Avatar CJColucci in reply to DensityDuck
        Ignored
        says:

        Don’t we have an expectation that the goods we purchase will be well-made, competently presented, and enjoyable?

        We do. What basis we have for that expectation is another question.Report

        • Avatar DensityDuck in reply to CJColucci
          Ignored
          says:

          No more basis than in any type of entertainment, I suppose. And, as I keep saying, if you want to make the argument that a performer owes nothing to the audience then that’s a viewpoint with some validity but it’s also not really what’s going on in pro sports, although the notion that the 49ers are being rotten on purpose as an art project is rather droll.Report

          • Avatar greginak in reply to DensityDuck
            Ignored
            says:

            Even if the “performer” owes something to the audience, significant physical injury/harm would negate that debt. Also the performer is the NFL and the Colts. Luck was an employee.

            In terms of enjoying sports, part of the deal with watching a game is your team may sucks eggs and the game is boring/terrible/un fun to watch. That’s all part of the game.Report

  4. Avatar Saul Degraw
    Ignored
    says:

    I am far from a sports guy but my very rough view is that Football advertises and markets itself as the sport of “real America” (TM). This has been true since the late 1980s at least but possibly older. Basically, football sees itself as more rural, more macho, more pickup truck, more conservative, etc. This is after all the sport that tried to make Rush Limbaugh a commentator in the early aughts, that shows you who NFL thinks of as its primary audience. Can you imagine basketball or baseball doing this? I cannot.

    This is only going to continue as people opt-out of football because of the physical toll. The sport will then attract the biggest machos of the machos as fans. Most of whom are not very healthy themselves.Report

    • Avatar DensityDuck in reply to Saul Degraw
      Ignored
      says:

      “This is after all the sport that tried to make Rush Limbaugh a commentator in the early aughts”

      and they tried to make Dennis Miller a commentator as well, and he was on more than Limbaugh was

      and it’s not as though both sides don’t accept football as a metaphor for Real America, which you yourself do right hereReport

    • Avatar Marchmaine in reply to Saul Degraw
      Ignored
      says:

      I dunno man… pro football isn’t Friday Night Lights… these days its a pretty sophisticated blend of Urbano-Murica… Robots and Hip-Hop-Pop Country… at times it panders one way or the other, but if you step back and look at it as a whole, its kinda impressive, really.Report

      • Avatar InMD in reply to Marchmaine
        Ignored
        says:

        I actually think it’s one of the very few institutions out there that, warts and all (including the big dumb one with the red hair), tries and in many ways succeeds, at appealing accross the culture war divide.Report

  5. Avatar Jaybird
    Ignored
    says:

    There are a lot of reasons that jobs end. Sometimes you get fired. Sometimes you get laid off. Sometimes you quit. Sometimes the company goes out of business.

    One of the things that *I* grew up with was the “two weeks’ notice” thing. It is appropriate to give your employer two weeks’ notice.

    A tweet went viral a couple weeks ago about a guy who just up and quit Subway via text message “I ain’t comin’ in tomorrow” or similar and the manager texted back about unprofessionalism or something like that and the guy said something like “You’re lucky you got a text.”

    There were several different kinds of responses to this that covered the spectrum. Some people thought that millennial entitlement manifesting as premature quitting from a minimum wage service job was beyond the pale. Other people gigglesnorted and said some variant of “fight the power”.

    Luck quit because he looked at his life and said “nah, I’d rather not” and quit. Was the timing perfect?

    Those who love Colts Football probably have a point when they say something like “HE SHOULD HAVE QUIT TWO WEEKS BEFORE THE DRAFT!” because, had he done that, Luck quitting would have had less of an impact on Colts Football for this season, maybe the next one. As it is, Luck quitting has more of an impact on Colts Football for this season, maybe the next one.

    And for those who care deeply about Colts Football, it makes sense to say “ARGH! THIS INCONVENIENCES ME!”

    But, at the end of the day, they’re lucky they got a text.Report

    • Avatar Andrew Donaldson in reply to Jaybird
      Ignored
      says:

      as with all breaking news stories, there is more coming out now. Some reports are saying he told the Colts as far back as April, and there have been multiple reports now that Jacoby Brissett, who is replacing him, was told by Luck last week that he was done. At some point the truth with come out. Part of the story, that I didn’t want to get into since it has it’s own life and is fluid, is that the news broke during a preseason game while Luck is standing on the sideline. So people are seeing the tweets and looking at their TV’s and thinking “oh he just walked up and quit”. It is a bad optic, like you said, but just that: an optic. The people that needed to know apparently knew.Report

      • Avatar Aaron David in reply to Andrew Donaldson
        Ignored
        says:

        I was waiting for this part. Luck was THE center of attention for the owners/managers/coaches/etc. in this area, and there is no F-ing way they weren’t up in the middle of the decision making process at every step in the road. ‘Cause, while Luck may make X-millions per year, the team makes X+Y millions from him. That they would be trying to work every angle on this is a given. What fans (and jackasses of the hot-take) saw was only one final aspect of what was going on. They didn’t see the doctors reports, the pleading for one last season, the discussions with his wife, the pain he was in after each practice, etc.

        I am not a Colts fan and I don’t consume any sports media, much for reasons like this. I like to watch a football game (or listen to a baseball game) so I can just enjoy the game, not the machinations behind it. I got enough of that in the working world.Report

      • Avatar Jaybird in reply to Andrew Donaldson
        Ignored
        says:

        If he told them in April, to hell with them. Dude can do whatever the hell he wants. More power to him.Report

      • Avatar Pinky in reply to Andrew Donaldson
        Ignored
        says:

        “At some point the truth with come out. “

        Probably not. There will be slightly different stories from “sources familiar with the events”, and at least two versions from actual identifiable people. Fan theories will include the possibility that Spike Lee was behind it (because he wants the team to end up in San Diego so that LA won’t lose one of theirs, of course).Report

        • Avatar InMD in reply to Pinky
          Ignored
          says:

          I think they’ve known it was coming. I heard this morning they won’t exerxcise their clawbacks which implies to me that they think he may heal up, do a lap around the globe, and play again. They clearly don’t want to ruin the relationship.Report

    • Avatar Michael Cain in reply to Jaybird
      Ignored
      says:

      Those who love Colts Football probably have a point when they say something like “HE SHOULD HAVE QUIT TWO WEEKS BEFORE THE DRAFT!”

      The only ones who have a point are the ones who, at the beginning of April, were saying, “It’s Andrew Luck. His injuries always get worse and take longer to heal than anyone thinks. If he won’t retire, trade him now, while you can get value for him, and then try to find a new QB who can save next season on short notice.”Report

      • Avatar jason in reply to Michael Cain
        Ignored
        says:

        Yeah, they were watching him get creamed season after season. I just read article that suggested his story will be one of the biggest talent wastes in pro-football. I don’t know if that’s accurate or not, but it sure seems like it is.Report

  6. Avatar Pinky
    Ignored
    says:

    I was going to say that every team should have backups for their starting players. I remembered that Brissett had started for the Colts for a full season. I had forgotten that they went 4-12 that season. So I can understand fan frustration. The problem is that we’ve had a few genetic freaks recently (Favre, Peyton, Brady), and people expect 20 years out of their quarterback now.

    I’d like to see the NFL and the players association come to some decent agreements to protect players. The thing they won’t do is make shorter seasons, which is a shame. The league wants to move to 18 games, and they might get it. Their dream is to make Presidents’ Day into Superbowl weekend. Would the players insist on a 16 game cap per player? I don’t think the fans would like that.Report

  7. Avatar Sam Wilkinson
    Ignored
    says:

    It is remarkable how many other athletes are simultaneously praising Luck while also unmercifully dunking on the idiot sports talkers who insist that their judgments of Luck’s retirement are worth taking seriously.Report

  8. Avatar Frank Benlin
    Ignored
    says:

    > Some fans will scream about “loyalty” or “letting the team down” but they can all collectively have a seat and shut up.

    Stay classyReport

  9. Avatar Slade the Leveller
    Ignored
    says:

    Years ago I heard a guy being interviewed, I think on Fresh Air but I’m not certain, about why he didn’t watch TV anymore. He said one weekend day his wife was having a garage sale and she wanted his help. He told her he couldn’t because he had to watch the Celtics game. His wife asked him if he thought Larry Bird cared whether he watched the game or not. He thought about it for a second, and wheeled the TV out to the garage to be added to the sale.

    I’ve been a high school football official for nearly 30 years. I’ve watched the number of players shrink as the awareness grows about what football does to a body. My son played football in grade school (he finished in 2010). I wouldn’t let him today. We have ex-players in the news for committing suicide because they can feel the onset of CTE. I’ve been predicting the demise of high school football for a few years now, and I’m pretty sure I’ll see it in my lifetime. Pro football may never disappear, but I can see it being marginalized, much as professional boxing has become.

    Good for Andrew Luck for getting out a rich man.Report

    • Avatar Zac Black in reply to Slade the Leveller
      Ignored
      says:

      “Pro football may never disappear, but I can see it being marginalized, much as professional boxing has become.”

      I’ve been saying this almost word for word for about a decade now, and most people think I’m nuts. Glad to see people are finally coming around on this point.Report

    • Avatar Frank Benlin in reply to Slade the Leveller
      Ignored
      says:

      > He told her he couldn’t because he had to watch the Celtics game. His wife asked him if he thought Larry Bird cared whether he watched the game or not. He thought about it for a second, and wheeled the TV out to the garage to be added to the sale.

      I find this very suspicious, mostly because it is from A Bronx Tale (except Mickey Mantle and the Yankees) and because I’m sure there were shows his wife liked watching. It’s very self-congratulatory and makes my eyes roll.

      > Pro football may never disappear, but I can see it being marginalized, much as professional boxing has become.

      Yes, I can see football only being played by children who feel they have literally no other choice to make it out of poverty. However, as long as colleges hand out 85 scholarships to play football, it will never fall to the level of boxing, where the sport was outlawed in colleges in 1960.Report

      • Avatar Slade the Leveller in reply to Frank Benlin
        Ignored
        says:

        I don’t recall that scene, but it’s been awhile. I should rewatch that movie anyway. It’s really good.

        Football is a very expensive sport to play. The equipment is expensive (I have a friend who sells $950 helmets.), insurance is expensive, and staffing it is expensive. And the insurance premiums aren’t going down. If the high school pipeline dries up, I can see football existing only at the power 5 conference level.

        Yes, I can see football only being played by children who feel they have literally no other choice to make it out of poverty.

        It’s already happening.

        https://rolltide.com/sports/2016/6/10/sports-m-footbl-archive-m-footbl-archive-1970-html.aspx?id=208

        https://rolltide.com/sports/2016/6/10/sports-m-footbl-archive-m-footbl-archive-2015-html.aspx?id=162Report

      • Avatar DensityDuck in reply to Frank Benlin
        Ignored
        says:

        As I said up above, the only way football can continue is if they stop people being crippled by playing at the pro level, and the only way to do that is to limit the impact forces sustained, and the only way to do *that* is to put an upper limit on the size and speed of players, and since that’s not actually possible to do with humans the only solution will be to eliminate the humans. First the down-field defense and D-line ends will switch to drones and use touch-football rules (if the drone bumps into you then you’re down), then the rest of D-line will probably go drones as well once they figure out rules for dealing with running backs–since the drones can’t grab but can get in the way, maybe a ten-second clock starts once the back gets the ball and he has to figure a way past them or the play’s blown dead. And if your D-line is drones then your O-line might as well be drones too, meaning that the only actual humans will be the quarterback, the running back, and the receivers…Report

        • Avatar Frank Benlin in reply to DensityDuck
          Ignored
          says:

          > the only way to do *that* is to put an upper limit on the size and speed of players

          There are a couple of ways to do that. First, you could get rid of unlimited substitution, which would cause larger players to be disfavored for smaller players who have more stamina.

          Also, there is something called Sprint Football, in which there is a weight limit for all players of 178 pounds.Report

          • Avatar DensityDuck in reply to Frank Benlin
            Ignored
            says:

            Which works but then you’ll get things like in wrestling, with people starving and dehydrating themselves to fit the weight limit, and that’ll cause its own health problems (we’ll move from concussion syndrome to long-term malnutrition)

            Changing around substitution might work but that just means the second-rankers will be big strong fast guys as well, they’ll just get to play more now (you’ll have “first-half lines” and “second-half lines”)Report

  10. Avatar Tod Kelly
    Ignored
    says:

    This is largely being treated as a binary thing because that’s what we do with everything now – but it really isn’t binary, and lots of things can be simultaneously true.

    Does Luck have a right to make his own decisions about his life? Of course.

    Does he owe “the public” spending more years working in career he no longer wants to work in and thinks might be damaging him in life-lasting ways? Not really.

    Was the timing of his decision ideal for everyone else? Not remotely.

    Do his business partners, vendors, and employers have a case to be a little cheesed, whether or not the choose to appear that way publicly? Probably, yeah. We all would.

    Is there something wrong with Colts fans who have been waiting for half a year for “next year” to gnash their teeth and howl at the moon now that “next year” is going away before it even began, and now they have to adjust to “*next* next year?” Hell yeah. If this were the Lakers and LeBron I would be screaming at my cat.

    Should Luck have the expectation that the media complex that surrounds the NFL let him off easy and not really make this into a story? No. Part of why he is (probably) set up for life financially is because this was the ecosystem he decided to profit off of with his skills, and when you do that you have to be willing to take the good with the bad.Report

  11. Avatar Kazzy
    Ignored
    says:

    Someone should pull up that piece I wrote about Josh Beckett once. I think it was my first or second piece?Report

  12. Avatar DensityDuck
    Ignored
    says:

    Incidentally, so far the Colts are #2 in their division at 5-4, which is only slightly below average for second-place teams so far. (meanwhile there are absolutely rotten teams — the Bengals haven’t even won a game this year!) So I guess the people suggesting that Luck leaving wasn’t all that big a deal for the Colts were right after all. I still think they handled the exit badly, but it does seem like you can make an argument that it was still worth going to the games even without him.Report

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