Wednesday Writs for 4/10

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Em Carpenter

Em was one of those argumentative children who was sarcastically encouraged to become a lawyer, so she did. She is a proud life-long West Virginian, and, paradoxically, a liberal. In addition to writing about society, politics and culture, she enjoys cooking, podcasts, reading, and pretending to be a runner. She will correct your grammar. You can find her on Twitter.

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14 Responses

  1. Avatar Road Scholar
    Ignored
    says:

    L9: FYI, link is to the dog racism thing in L8.

    And interesting stuff as always Em.Report

  2. Avatar Doctor Jay
    Ignored
    says:

    By my reckoning, Garfield was the second of four(4) assassinated presidents, the others being Lincoln, McKinley and Kennedy. I wouldn’t nitpick except it seems like it might be some in-joke or statement from you.

    I enjoyed the detail on Guiteau. I had a piano teacher with that last name. I never asked if there was a connection, I was too young.Report

  3. Avatar PD Shaw
    Ignored
    says:

    L1: There have been four Presidential assassinations: Lincoln, Garfield, McKinley and Kennedy.

    Three of them connected to Robert Todd Lincoln. He was present at his father’s death bed; he served as Garfield’s Secretary of War and was at the train station when he was shot; and he was present at the Pan-American exposition at the invitation of McKinley when he was shot.

    Unfortunately for Garfield, it was Robert who recommended Dr. Bliss to administer the gun shot wound, mistakenly believing that Bliss had been his father’s physician. Bliss had been present at Lincoln’s deathbed, but the other doctors did not give him any role, a slight that did not prevent him from taking credit and taught him to not allow other interlopers to come between him and fame next time. “Where ignorance is bliss, ’tis folly to be wise.”Report

  4. Avatar PD Shaw
    Ignored
    says:

    [L6] “Texas has opted to allow no religious leaders in the room henceforth.”

    That was my prediction of where this issue was heading previouslyReport

    • Avatar Jaybird in reply to PD Shaw
      Ignored
      says:

      Good prediction!

      (It’s, honestly, the smart move. Maybe not the “moral” one, whatever the hell *THAT* means, but the smart one.)Report

      • Avatar Em Carpenter in reply to Jaybird
        Ignored
        says:

        The thing is they are still required to allow the condemned to meet with their chosen cleric prior to the execution, and that person has to be vetted and cleared, so all of their hand-wringing about how hard it may be to accommodate a particular faith is not solved by their chosen policy.
        So, once you’ve procured that cleric, how hard is it to go through a debriefing: “this is the procedure, you must stand in this spot, you may not touch the prisoner, if shit goes south you do X, failure to follow these rules is punishable by y,” etc.
        I guess this is a somewhat easier path to take but not by much.Report

  5. Avatar Oscar Gordon
    Ignored
    says:

    L9: I didn’t know Mississippi had any roads with a long enough straight section for a car to get up to 180.Report

    • Avatar Michael Cain in reply to Oscar Gordon
      Ignored
      says:

      Some mornings you have to love the internet.

      The road where it happened runs along the top of a dam, dead straight for a bit over three miles, four-lane divided road with no intersections. So, a minute at 180 mph. Articles on the performance for that car model suggest a 0-160 mph time of about 27 seconds. Sufficient room to get it up to 180 and back down.

      When I was young and foolish and worked at Bell Labs, there was an informal thing called the Century Club for idiots who got up to 100 mph on the road from the entrance to the main building. An entry curve, about a half-mile straight, then an exit curve onto the ring road. If you didn’t make the exit curve, you ended up in the cooling pond. I shared a house with two other engineers. I could get to 100 in my 280ZX by virtue of being able to come out of the entry curve at 50. One of my housemates could get to 100 on pure straight-line acceleration in his old Mustang with an oversized V8 he had tinkered with. The other housemate had a Camaro but always chickened out at about 80. The company made it a firing offense after three cars had to be fished out of the pond one month.Report

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