Monthly Archive: November 2018

education

Are Finland’s Schools Really the Gold Standard?

It is a given that at some point during almost any discussion about school reform, a reference to Finland’s education system will arise. However, a closer look at Finland’s education system and reforms raises questions about the popular narrative of its education system.

history

Linky Friday: A Bit of History

Linky Friday, Ordinary Times’ end-of-week tradition of bringing you links from across the web and around the world. This week, A Bit of History with stories, photos, videos, music, and more for you to read, share, and discuss.

If You See This

Welcome Back to Ordinary Times! We’re getting some certification errors that should resolve soon.

Wednesday Writs for 11/28

This week’s round-up of the best and most interesting law-related links from around the web, featuring med mal, criminal law developments, Alec Baldwin, and more.

Let the People Gerrymander Themselves

Many of the arguments about gerrymandering now fall back on complex mathematical overlays to geography and the Civil Rights Act, but the Supreme Court justices remain bewildered and unimpressed. There is, however, a much more elegant and simple solution to the problem that allows for a far fairer representative system: eliminate the district lines altogether.

law

St. George Tucker and the Theology of the Common Law

Thomas Jefferson disagreed with Blackstone’s notion that “Christianity is part of the common law.” Legal jurist St. George Tucker may have provided an Enlightenment alternative to Jefferson’s notion while revising Blackstone for America.