Morning Ed: Health {2018.04.16.T}

[He1] Accountable Care Organizations were supposed to save money, but they haven’t. I was mildly optimistic about this one, so I’m disappointed.

[He2] I’m thinking maybe we need to start reaching out to Venezuelan doctors and being flexible about residency requirements. {More}

[He3] Not that we didn’t already know this, but Facebook has some boundary problems.

[He4] Well, that’s one way to get a juror on your side: Former Offspring drummer turned OB/GYN saves juror during his own Bay Area malpractice trial.

[He5] I wouldn’t necessarily assume that the World Health Organization actually cares about having all the facts.

[He6] To the extent possible, I prefer vaccinations remain voluntary. But boy I want to nudge like hell.

[He7] This is one area where I could see price controls actually working well. California is an interesting place that on the one hand may be better able to get away with it due to the desirability of living there (people getting squeezed won’t want to leave) but is complicated by the rather successful Kaiser model out there.

[He8] You’ve heard of being buried alive, but a woman in Russia was apparently embalmed alive.

[He9] This is not the first study to show that cigarette taxes end up pushing people towards public assistance. Maybe they just work as a back way transfer from national and state governments to state and local governments.


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Will Truman is a former para-IT professional who is presently a stay-at-home father in the Mountain East. He has moved around frequently, having lived in six places since 2003, ranging from rural outposts to major metropolitan areas. He is also on Twitter. ...more →

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7 thoughts on “Morning Ed: Health {2018.04.16.T}

  1. He6: I am paywalled out of the article but…Maybe parents who want to refuse vaccines should be made to read about kids who have had transplanted organs (or are on chemo) and can’t be vaccinated? And what might happen if their kid spread a disease to that kid? (I am paranoid: I actually went and had a measles titer done – which, amazingly, my health insurance covered – during a recent measles outbreak, just to be sure I was still protected from the vaccines I had in my past. And yes, for some reason my doctor thought the titer made more sense than just giving me another MMR vaccine, which I was willing to do)

    He8: I originally saw that shared (as a link) on Twitter. I was like “You’re going to regret clicking that link and reading that story” but I clicked and read ANYWAY. I was not wrong. Now I have yet another medical phobia….

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    • I can’t imagine a valid reason for letting drug companies get away with that. Buy Drum is right, resolving it by lawsuit is needlessly cumbersome – my first suggestion would be to just remove whatever restrictions that stop generics makers buying the drugs at a pharmacy, but failing that Drum’s solution is reasonably good.

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