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Mike Schilling

Mike has been a software engineer far longer than he would like to admit. He has strong opinions on baseball, software, science fiction, comedy, contract bridge, and European history, any of which he's willing to share with almost no prompting whatsoever.

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42 Responses

  1. Avatar Kazzy says:

    17. Peter Pan by JM BarrieReport

  2. Avatar Glyph says:

    1. Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court, Twain
    4. Neuromancer, Gibson
    5. Old Man and the Sea, Hemingway
    7. The Trial, Kafka
    8. Catcher in the Rye, Salinger
    12. Fahrenheit 451, Bradbury
    15. Tale of Two Cities, Dickens
    16. Moby-Dick, Melville
    18. Confederacy of Dunces, Toole

    Man, a couple of these are driving me crazy because they seem so familiar yet I can’t place them, or I am pretty sure I know author but not work.Report

  3. Okay, here’s my stab at some of the answers:

    2. Capote, “Breakfast at Tiffany’s.” (very unsure about this one)
    5. Hemingway, “Old Man and the Sea.” (pretty sure about this one)
    8. Salinger, “Catcher in the Rye.”
    10. [I have no idea, but I’m interested to know who’d do a parody of Joyce’s Ulysses.]
    12. Bradbury, “Fahrenheit 451” (not 100% certain)
    13. Heller, “Catch 22.”
    15. Dickens, “Tale of Two Cities.”
    19. [sounds very familiar, but just can’t place it.]
    20. Henry James, “The Americans” [just a guess, but sounds like something he’d write, and I’ve never read “The Americans.”]Report

  4. Avatar Kolohe says:

    3. Leo Tolstoy “Anna Karina”

    6. George Orwell “1984”Report

  5. Avatar Doctor Jay says:

    1. At the Sign of the Four, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.
    12. A Clockwork Orange, Anthony Boucher
    19. Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen

    [@glyph and @gabriel-conroy got most of the ones I knew, and a few more]Report

  6. Avatar Pinky says:

    Stinking honor code. I would have got #17, but I had to go online and double-check it. (I wouldn’t have gotten the author anyway.)Report

  7. 1. A Study in Scarlet, Arthur Conan Doyle
    5. Old Man and the Sea, Hemingway
    6. 1984, Orwell
    8. Catcher in the Rye, Salinger
    15. A Tale of Two Cities, DickensReport

  8. Avatar Saul Degraw says:

    2. Breakfast at Tiffany’s, Capote.

    3. Anna Karenina, Tolstoy

    4. Neuromance, Gibson.

    5. The Old Man and the Sea, Hemmingway

    6. 1984, Orwell

    7. The Trial, Kafka

    8. Catcher in the Rye, Salinger

    10. Ulysses, James Joyce.

    11. The Great Gatsby, Fitzgerald

    12.Farenheit 451, Bradbury

    15. A Tale of Two Cities, Dickens.

    16. Moby Dick, Melville

    17. Peter Pan, Barrie

    19. Pride and Prejudice, Austen

    18. A Confederacy of Dunces, TooleReport

  9. Avatar Mike Schilling says:

    Recap so far:

    Glyph, 8 points: 4, 5, 7, 8, 12, 15, 16, 18
    Gabriel, 2 points: 10, 13
    Kolohe, 2 points: 3, 6
    Kazzy, 1 point: 17
    Doctor Jay, 1 point: 19
    Mark, 1 point: 1
    Saul, 1 point: 11

    Still unguessed: 2, 9, 14, 20Report

  10. Avatar KenB says:

    Wow, I’m late to the party. I believe #2 is Emma by Jane Austen. 20 sounds familiar but I can’t place it.Report

  11. Avatar Jeff lipton says:

    #20 is Scaramouch (spelling) but I don’t recall the author…Report

  12. Avatar aaron david says:

    14 is Scaramouch by Sabatini.Report

  13. Avatar ScarletNumbers says:

    9 Ford The Good SoldierReport

  14. Avatar Mike Schilling says:

    Glyph, 8 points: 4, 5, 7, 8, 12, 15, 16, 18
    Gabriel, 2 points: 10, 13
    Kolohe, 2 points: 3, 6
    Kazzy, 1 point: 17
    Doctor Jay, 1 point: 19
    Mark, 1 point: 1
    Saul, 1 point: 11
    KenB 1 point: 2
    Aaron, 1 point: 14
    Scarlet, 1 point: 9

    Still open: 20. The exact answer is tough unless you happen to know it, because so many of his books are similar, but I would have thought the voice is unmistakable. It’s not exactly a series book, though the main character also appeared in his second-best-known series.Report

    • Avatar Pinky says:

      I can’t imagine continuing to read a book with a first sentence like that.Report

      • Avatar Mike Schilling says:

        You’re right that the second sentence doesn’t quite live up to it.

        One of the things which Petunia Pig had impressed on Yosemite Sam when he left for this holiday on the Riviera was that he must be sure to practice his French, and Petunia’s word was law.Report

  15. Avatar Doctor Jay says:

    2. Emma, Jane AustenReport

  16. Avatar Tod Kelly says:

    Now that I have time for this, I’m a little excite to play. But I might list my answers is groups…

    ANSWERS I ABSOLUTELY KNOW ARE TRUE

    1: Study In Scarlett, Doyle
    3: Anna Karenia, Tolstoy
    5. Old Man & Sea, Hemingway
    6. 1984, Orwell
    7. The Trial, Kafka
    10. Ulysses, Joyce
    12. Fahrenheit 451, Bradbury
    14. Scaramouche, Sabatini
    15. Tale of Two Cities, Dickens
    16. Moby Dick, Melville
    18. Confederacy of Dunces, Toole

    ANSWERS I AM PRETTY SURE ARE RIGHT

    8. Catcher In the Rye, Salinger
    9. Good Soldier, FM Ford
    11. Great Gatsby, Fitzgerald
    13. Lolita, Nabokov (though if I am right, the sentence has been edited?)

    ANSWERS I AM TAKING AN EDUCATED GUESS WITH

    4. Infinite Jest, DF Wallace
    17. Peter & Wendy (Peter Pan), JM Barrie
    19. Emma, Austen
    20. I know the series (Jeeves & Wooster) and the author Woodhouse), but am unsure of the book, so I will guess My Man Jeeves?

    ANSWERS I AM TOTALLY PULLING OUT OF MY ASS

    2: Run Rabbit Run, Updike

    And FWIW, this was SO much fun Mike. It reminds me of those awesome movie contests Pat used to do.Report

  17. Avatar Chris says:

    Since pretty much all of them have been guessed, I’m just going to say that I’m proud of myself for having read most of these (I haven’t read 1, 4, 14, or 20, though I actually guessed who wrote 20… well, I guessed it was one of a couple people, and the actual author was one of those). The llist contains two books I love, as well: #3 and #9 (#5 might be a third).Report

    • Avatar Mike Schilling says:

      There were about 25 years during which everything he wrote was wonderful, and #20 is a fine example, even if it’s not as well-known as the Wrrirf or Oynaqvatf books.Report

      • Avatar Chris says:

        I’ve been reading that series (the well-known one) on my Kindle largely because you kept talking about the books. I’m enjoying them very much.Report

  18. Avatar aaron david says:

    I had a guess about #20 – Waugh Sword of Honor, but Crouchback is in Italy before the war, not France.Report

    • Avatar Mike Schilling says:

      I love the guess, but if it were Waugh, surely Marchmaine would have gotten it 🙂Report

      • Avatar aaron david says:

        Point.Report

      • Avatar Glyph says:

        I guess it shows what a philistine I am that seeing “Waugh” makes me think that someone got a football jerked away before they could kick it, or their kite got eaten by a tree.Report

      • Avatar Mike Schilling says:

        I think you’d like a lot of his books. They’re often very funny, and you’d appreciate, if not totally agree with, their point of view. If you’re looking for something to read, I’d recommend Vile Bodies as a start. There’s also a pretty good film version called Bright Young Things, screenplay written by and directed by Stephen Fry.Report

  19. Avatar rexknobus says:

    1. A Study in Scarlet – Conan Doyle
    3. Anna Karenina – Tolstoy
    5. The Old Man and Sea – Hemingway
    6. 1984 – Orwell
    8. Catcher in the Rye – Salinger
    13. Catch-22 – Heller
    15. A Tale of Two Cities – Dickens
    16. Moby Dick – Melville
    17. Peter Pan – Barrie
    19. Pride and Prejudice – AustenReport

  20. Avatar Mike Schilling says:

    Since it seems unlikely at this point that anyone is going to get #20, I’ll reveal the answer:

    The Luck of the Bodkins, by (as Tod guessed) P. G. Wodehouse.Report