Monday Trivia #131

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Will Truman

Will Truman is the Editor-in-Chief of Ordinary Times. He is also on Twitter.

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47 Responses

  1. Avatar Chris
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    says:

    Georgie? I didn’t know you and Georgia were on such familiar terms.Report

  2. Avatar Michael Cain
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    says:

    Hmmm… Wyoming leads the list, along with three other large western states. Colorado is in the last four, along with three of the Eastern statelets.Report

  3. Avatar Pinky
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    says:

    Percentage of land owned by the federal government? Nah, probably not. Idaho couldn’t be lower than NY.Report

  4. Avatar Pinky
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    says:

    This one has me stumped. Just about any demographic thing I can think of would have Hawaii, Utah, or Nevada at one extreme or the other. I don’t think I’ve ever seen a list of anything that puts Utah at #22. It’s not population density, or congressional representation per person (WY made me think of that). There are some energy producers near the beginning, but then North Dakota should be right there with them. It doesn’t even match last night’s Miss America rankings (and how cruel would it be to publish the bottom 10%, anyway?).Report

  5. Avatar Will Truman
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    says:

    Monday Hint: It’s a percentage of something.Report

  6. Avatar Alan Scott
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    says:

    Ooh, I know: all of them are US states.Report

  7. Avatar Burt Likko
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    says:

    Vehicles on the road powered by LNG.Report

  8. Avatar Chris
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    says:

    If Wyoming’s #1, it’s gotta be something to do with national parks, right? I mean, is there anything else in Wyoming?Report

  9. Avatar Kolohe
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    says:

    Percentage of population that lives free *and* dies.Report

  10. Avatar Mo
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    says:

    This is close to, but not quite, the suicide rate ranking list. Maybe it’s a subset, like teen suicide rate.Report

  11. Avatar Trumwill
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    says:

    Tuesday Hint: It’s a bit surprising that there isn’t a stronger political correlation on the list, because it’s mostly or entirely a matter of state government policy.Report

  12. Avatar Mark Thompson
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    says:

    Percentage of land dedicated to state parks?Report

  13. Avatar Will Truman
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    says:

    Wednesday Hint:
    Wyoming is 86%
    Texas 62.6%
    North Dakota 51%
    United States 53.5%
    Indiana 41%
    Delaware 27.6%
    New Hampshire 15%Report

  14. Avatar Will Truman
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    says:

    Monday Trivia Answer: Percentage of college tuition costs covered by the state.Report

    • Avatar Michael Cain in reply to Will Truman
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      says:

      Does your source explain how they calculated the amount? The way Colorado does things is really peculiar, and while I’m not surprised that we’re far down on the list, I’m just curious if they got things correct.Report

      • Avatar trumwill in reply to Michael Cain
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        says:

        Here is the source. For what it’s worth, it looks like only somewhat recently that Colorado has been on the slide. It looks like something happened between 2001 and 2003.Report

      • Avatar Brandon Berg in reply to Michael Cain
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        says:

        Some background on Wyoming: Wyoming is, surprisingly, one of the wealthiest states in the country in terms of per-capita GDP. My guess is that this is due to a fair bit of natural resource wealth divided by a very small population. America’s Norway, essentially.

        Actually, I guess Alaska is America’s Norway. Same deal economically, but they also have the weather for it.Report

      • Avatar trumwill in reply to Michael Cain
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        says:

        Up until recently, Wyoming let out-of-staters take their distance ed courses for $100/hr, which was roughly half the cost of the next cheapest option. Unfortunately, they decided to start charging out-of-staters more. North Dakota doesn’t, but is still over twice as much.Report

      • Avatar Brandon Berg in reply to Michael Cain
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        says:

        I thought I mentioned this in my last comment, but the source link is broken.Report

      • Avatar Michael Cain in reply to Michael Cain
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        says:

        Wyoming is, surprisingly, one of the wealthiest states in the country in terms of per-capita GDP.

        They fall significantly when you use median household income instead, which I’ve always thought was a more useful measure — . Nevertheless, Wyoming has tucked away a lot of severance tax revenue (largely paid by people in other states) to support higher ed.

        Colorado’s spending on higher ed demonstrates that Grover Norquist’s “starve the beast” strategy can work at a state level where there are balanced budget requirements. The Taxpayer Bill of Rights amendment (TABOR) added to the Colorado state constitution in 1992 was designed to permanently ratchet down state spending every time there was a recession. The ratchet was removed by voters in 2005 (then-governor Bill Owens probably cost himself a national role for the Republicans by campaigning for the 2005 change). Absent those “Ref C” changes, the 2007-09 recession would probably have taken Colorado out of the higher education business entirely. At one point during the recession, the legislature’s Joint Budget Committee required every state post-secondary school to submit their plan for dealing with the situation of zero state funding.Report

      • Avatar Brandon Berg in reply to Michael Cain
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        says:

        They fall significantly when you use median household income instead, which I’ve always thought was a more useful measure

        Which one is more useful depends on how you intend to use it. GDP is a better measure of money available for the state to tax, I would think.Report

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