Game of Thrones: “The Rains Of Castamere”

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Ethan Gach

I write about comics, video games and American politics. I fear death above all things. Just below that is waking up in the morning to go to work. You can follow me on Twitter at @ethangach or at my blog, gamingvulture.tumblr.com. And though my opinions aren’t for hire, my virtue is.

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32 Responses

  1. Avatar Glyph says:

    the Hound’s continued protection of her is notable

    This may be tough to answer without spoiling, but it sounds like you don’t know the story any further in the future than I do – why WOULD the Hound continue to protect Arya? As you note, she’s now worse than useless as a pawn, she’s an outright liability at best – is it just some grudging respect he has for her little bad-ass self (or residual affection for whatever weird thing he had with her sister Sansa)?

    Also, I realize that Jon reclaiming his oath as a crow means he can’t take Ygritte to the Wall (crows can’t wed), and maybe he felt it would be safer/better for her if he simply left her with Torren – but that was cold, just bailing on her like that.Report

    • Avatar Ethan Gach in reply to Glyph says:

      “why WOULD the Hound continue to protect Arya?”

      I have no idea either, but I hope he does, if only because it presents an interesting and important contrast to all of the other actions motivated by ambition and self-interest.

      Side question: is he a knight?

      Also, my friends felt the same way, but I was so displeased with how their little winter romance came about and played out that I was like, yes, finally, getting back down to the business of stuff that matters–don’t make the same mistake as your brother.Report

      • Avatar Pub Editor in reply to Ethan Gach says:

        Sandor Clegane is no knight (as he tells Ser Loras Tyrell in season 1), and he has a bit of a grudge against all knights.Report

      • Avatar Glyph in reply to Ethan Gach says:

        The Hound is definitely not a knight (he corrects anyone who calls him Ser).

        I can’t say I am going to miss these characters; they were ranging from bland to outright annoying this season – but still, that was pretty hard to watch. Someone over at AVClub pointed out that it was likely an indirect result of Catelyn’s decision to free Jaime – Jaime was likely the vector by which Roose and Tywin colluded, without which collusion things might have gone differently.

        And, really, GRRM – Robb’s wolf too, after giving us false hope Arya might free him at least? That’s cold, man, real cold.Report

      • Avatar North in reply to Ethan Gach says:

        The easiest way Ethan, without spoilers, is to track back Arya’s family tree and figure out if anyone is left who’s related to her and still in a position of power. The hound is mercenary so his next move can be intuited pretty well with that mental exercise.Report

    • Avatar Pub Editor in reply to Glyph says:

      (I am inserting random text here so as to avoid spoilers showing up in the Gifts of Gab.)

      I don’t know why the Hound in particular has decided to continue protecting Arya (the “residual affection for whatever weird thing he had with her sister Sansa” that Glyph mentions makes as much sense as any other theory).

      However, when OP writes, “she is nothing but a liability at this point. No one with military power, political capital, or financial wealth as any reason to sacrifice their own footing to help hers,” I am not so sure.

      Remember that Arya Stark has a bloodline claim to the lordship of Winterfell, and that claim could make her valuable as a pawn or a marriage partner. The world at large believes that Robb, Bran, and Rickon are all dead. That leaves Arya and Sansa as heirs to Ned Stark. Sure, Sansa has the senior claim, but Westeros is an unpredictable world, and as Arya would say, “Anyone can be killed.”Report

      • Avatar Glyph in reply to Pub Editor says:

        I was wondering about that…even if Sansa were killed, wouldn’t the lordship of Winterfell still be her husband’s (Tyrion’s) and/or that of any children they might have?Report

        • Avatar Pub Editor in reply to Glyph says:

          (Random text inserted so as to avoid spoilers showing up in the Gifts of Gab.)

          Tyrion is lord of winterfell only in right of his wife.

          If Sansa were to die without issue, then Winterfell passes to the next legitimate blood descendant of Ned Stark (i.e., Arya).

          If Sansa died but left behind a child, then that child would become lord of Winterfell. In the normal course of events, Tyrion, as the new lord’s parent, would remain regent and protector until the new lord comes of age.Report

          • Avatar Ethan Gach in reply to Pub Editor says:

            (I am inserting random text here so as to avoid spoilers showing up in the Gifts of Gab.)

            Whose name would the child have? Something, something Stark?Report

            • Avatar Pub Editor in reply to Ethan Gach says:

              (Random text inserted so as to avoid spoilers showing up in the Gifts of Gab.)

              The name would be Lannister, wouldn’t it? Maybe “Lannister-Stark”?

              FWIW, Joffrey calls himself “Joffrey Baratheon,” but he’s always wearing Lannister colors and symbols.

              Maybe they can do a scene where Tyrion and Sansa discuss baby names. You know, after Tyrion tells Sansa about how, um, someone murdered her mother and brother.Report

            • Avatar Marchmaine in reply to Ethan Gach says:

              Lannister; his heraldry would likely be 1/2 Lannister 1/2 Stark.Report

            • Avatar North in reply to Ethan Gach says:

              I am inserting random text here so as to avoid spoilers showing up in the Gifts of Gab.)

              Technically Tyrion’s child would be considered a Lannister by law and certainly by common view. It’s likely he would be called a Stark in the interests of marketing; Tyrion would have to pull out all the stops to try and rule the North now.Report

  2. Avatar North says:

    I am inserting random text here so as to avoid spoilers showing up in the Gifts of Gab.)

    The Red Wedding crushed me. For some reason I’ve always rooted for the more conventional characters in Martins books, possibly because their more esoteric underdog siblings are the author’s darlings. I loved Robb, and oddly Sansa, and the Young Wolfs’ successes were therapeutic for me through the first and second novel. The part when they decided to secede rang very true to me. Of course the valorous north, the noble Arie and the nurturing Riverlands could secede. They’d make a magnificent (and defensible) Kingdom and with no dragons to rule them they’d be a natural alliance. The Red Wedding crushed me when I read it in the books and I was astonished at how much it crushed me seeing it again on the show. Especially since I never was fond of Catlyn in either medium.

    I’m not sure which version of Rob’s wife I hated more. Rob marrying for honor impelled by a moment of weakness in the book or Rob marrying for love impelled by love in the show. I doubt I could ever have liked any woman married to Rob Stark; he was my boyfriend after all. I do appreciate, though, that Talesia was resolved with no great impact on the overall narrative. I think the book fans can now assume that Jane Westerling is truly a non-entity in the story lore as well.Report

    • Avatar Mike Schilling in reply to North says:

      If you’ve read Book Four you know that there is a bit more to Jeyne Westerling’s story, though I’d guess it ends there.Report

      • Avatar trumwill mobile in reply to Mike Schilling says:

        What happens with Westerling is sufficiently inconsequential that I don’t even remember it.Report

      • Avatar North in reply to Mike Schilling says:

        (I am inserting random text here so as to avoid spoilers showing up in the Gifts of Gab.)
        Spoilers
        Only that her Mother claimed they “intended this to happen all along” and that her Father landed himself a full on Lordship from it and she was escorted to Casterly Rock under heavy guard to make sure she never got preggers.

        There was speculation that there’d be more but since Martin is closely involved in the HBO writing I’d say this is a strong signal that Westerly became a non-entity after Rob’s death.Report

        • Avatar Mike Schilling in reply to North says:

          SPOILERS
          SPOILERS
          SPOILERS
          SPOILERS
          SPOILERS
          SPOILERS
          SPOILERS
          SPOILERS
          SPOILERS
          SPOILERS

          Exactly, the confirmation that Tywin Lannister was behind much of it. Remember when Tyrion complained that all Tywin ever did was write letters and Tywin told him that a letter might win the war?Report

    • Avatar Reformed Republican in reply to North says:

      (I am inserting random text here so as to avoid spoilers showing up in the Gifts of Gab.)

      Screw Robb. He got a whole bunch of people to rebel against the king, putting their lives and their lands at risk. That comes with responsibility. However, ignored his responsibility, and he broke his promise to wed for completely selfish reasons. Guess what Robb, being king means there are more important things than love. After breaking the promise, he then had the gall to force his uncle to marry in his stead, telling him how important it was for the war effort, even though Robb was not willing to do it himself? He had been warned that Frey was old, mean, and easily offended. It sucks that everyone else had to pay for his actions, but I have no sympathy for Robb.Report

      • RR,

        That’s a great idea for a post. Something like “F*** Robb Stark” #slatepitches. Cause yea, everything you said was spot on, and it’s sort of what I was getting at in the post (but which you nailed more directly)–it gets you to care about people that you shouldn’t.Report

  3. Avatar Jaybird says:

    I am inserting random text here so as to avoid spoilers TYRION DIES TYRION DIES TYRION DIESReport