Theromomixed Up, Part 8: The Wristwatch Edition

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David Ryan

David Ryan is a boat builder and USCG licensed master captain. He is the owner of Sailing Montauk and skipper of Montauk''s charter sailing catamaran MON TIKI You can follow him on Twitter @CaptDavidRyan

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11 Responses

  1. Avatar aaron
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    says:

    My mechanical Hamilton Military watch runs about 5 minutes fast, but as it was given to me by an old friend, it is truly a favored possession.

    By the way, love this series.

     

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    • Avatar David Ryan in reply to aaron
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      says:

      5 minutes fast in a year is good enough; 5 minutes fast in a day, not so much.

      And glad you’re enjoying the series. I seem to have some sort of pavlovian linkage between drinking coffee and writing. It’s nice to have an outlet!Report

  2. Avatar Simon K
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    says:

    George Daniels, who died last year, succeeded in making mechanical movements that could best quartz, including inventing an entirely new escapement. But he only every made 36 watches, and in spite of his efforts Omege only ever made a few limited edition watches using his new mechanism.Report

  3. Avatar Will Truman
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    says:

    I’m a watch fiend. I’m wearing a feature-rich-but-kind-of-geeky Casio now. I have two Casios, two generic, and three US Polo Association. Plus another one I got from Dad for Christmas. As a gift to myself when-if I give up smoking, I plan to buy an Invecta or two.

    The US Polo Association watches are made in Japan. I understand “American” products being made in China, but Japan actually hurts a little for some reason.

    I refuse to buy any watch that has roman numerals and uses “IV” for 4. It’s a bigger deal for clocks, which are more likely to have roman numerals, but it’s stopped me from getting a watch I otherwise wanted. Something just feels wrong about it.Report

  4. Avatar wardsmith
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    says:

    Bought my son a G-Shock watch when he graduated from university. He wore it until he got a smartphone. Now he uses the phone as a watch (as do I now coincidentally). I have  perfectly good watches lying around, but once I got out of the habit of wearing them (and into the habit of using my phone as a watch, therefore never losing my phone) it just seems too much bother. I had one of the very first digital watches, which I believe was advertized in Playboy magazine in the 70’s for about $1999.99 and for which I paid far too much used from an old guy who couldn’t quite read it. LOL, just searched for a picture of it (appended below) and found out that if it were still working it would be worth $10-15K. Once digital watches were out, I never bought another analog one. I even had the first Timex data watch that came out and at one time could tell you what the secret message in zeros and ones was on the watch band.

    I used to hit up the pawn shops when I was a kid and pocket watches were completely out of fashion. Picked up dozens for less than $5 apiece. Sold the whole box of them when I was a in college for about $25. I’d happily give $2500 for the box today, but can’t remember who I sold it to.

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  5. Avatar dilbert dogbert
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    says:

    Here is my watch story: Lost my self winding Timex while working in the garden. Next year when preparing for a new season I found the watch and gave it a shake. It went on ticking! Wore it till I lost it for good.Report

  6. Avatar dilbert dogbert
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    says:

    Here is my watch story: Lost my self winding Timex while working in the garden. Next year when preparing for a new season I found the watch and gave it a shake. It went on ticking! Wore it till I lost it for good.Report

  7. Avatar dilbert dogbert
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    says:

    Damn No Script!!!Report

  8. Avatar BlaiseP
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    says:

    My watch story.   My watch went missing.  I went storming around the house, looking here and there for it, angrily asking the children if they’d been playing with it.  I harangued the kids so hard my little son broke down and began to cry, saying he’d been playing with it and buried it in the garden.

    It was still too early in the year for planting.   I went out to the garden, looked at the soil carefully, nothing had been disturbed, nothing buried.  I’d have seen the fresh earth.

    I called for my son, kneeling in the garden, weeping horribly.   I held his shoulders and begged his forgiveness.  I’d pushed him too far and he’d confessed to something he couldn’t possibly have done.

    Some weeks later I found the watch, just an cheap Timex.   I gave the watch away.  I couldn’t bear to look at it.   I bought my son a lovely Fossil watch the next year.Report

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