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    • AvatarJaybird on Saturday Morning Gaming: LightmatterThose of you who enjoy psychological horror but might not have the best reflexes need to check out Cultist Simulator. (We talked about it here.) It's 50% off on the Steam (and DLC is 33% off). There's a lot of reading. There's a lot of paying attention to different timers. It's not a good game for when you're watching a movie in another window. Or after dark.
    • AvatarLeeEsq in reply to Saul Degraw on Apologia of Human Nature: Charlatans, Saints, Hoffer, and Burt Likko’s QueryThat doesn't mean I can't have romantic reverence for the Orthodox.
    • AvatarSlade the Leveller on Wednesday Writs: Lloyed Gaines Fights the Power EditionL7: “District lawyers argued that the outcome of recent elections had nothing to do with race but owed to Orthodox Jewish voters who want to keep property taxes low while making sure private school students receive state-mandated busing.” Allowing people to segregate themselves from their community at taxpayer expense is not a good use of those funds.
    • AvatarJaybird in reply to Oscar Gordon on The Turning of the NarrativeSomeone listening to the police scanner has tweeted that an ATM was blown up with a bomb. (I suspect it was, instead, fireworks or maybe a quarter-stick.) But the engineers have started to come out.
    • AvatarSlade the Leveller in reply to Jaybird on The Turning of the NarrativeGood for them. I hope they lay siege to that place.
    • AvatarOscar Gordon in reply to Jaybird on The Turning of the NarrativeClearly the engineers haven't gotten involved,or siege engines would be present.
    • AvatarSaul Degraw in reply to LeeEsq on Apologia of Human Nature: Charlatans, Saints, Hoffer, and Burt Likko’s QueryYou also called yourself agnostic at best
    • AvatarLeeEsq on Final ExaminationThe thing that gets to me about this final exam is that it is asking for the student to regurgitate trivia rather than solve problems or do any analysis. Memorizing trivia can be a big pain but it isn't really a mark of intelligence or that you mastered the subject. A test should show that you can solve problems or analyze the facts.
    • AvatarLeeEsq in reply to LeeEsq on Apologia of Human Nature: Charlatans, Saints, Hoffer, and Burt Likko’s QueryFor what it's worth, even though I can't live a Orthodox lifestyle I have romantic reverence or them. The Orthodox and their culture are the base of the Jewish people. Without the Orthodox, there would be no Jews.
    • AvatarChip Daniels in reply to George Turner on The Turning of the NarrativeRoger was no angel, he hung with a bad crowd.
    • AvatarLeeEsq in reply to veronica d on Apologia of Human Nature: Charlatans, Saints, Hoffer, and Burt Likko’s QueryOrthodox Judaism isn't exactly claiming to have inerrant truth in the same way that Christianity is, mainly because they don't believe the entire world should become Orthodox Jews or that bad things will happen to them in the after life if they do not. Orthodox Judaism is really orthopraxy, right practices not right beliefs. They argue that Jews should follow Jewish law and even among the Orthodox there are big disagreements about what this means.
    • AvatarJaybird on The Turning of the NarrativeThe riots have started. What's interesting isn't that Target got looted (these things happen). It's that the 3rd Precinct Police Station is being... what's the term? "Kinetically protested". The 3rd precinct is being destroyed pic.twitter.com/ZuvhSJu8sW— Karen Scullin FOX9 (@kscullinfox9) May 27, 2020
    • AvatarGeorge Turner in reply to Chip Daniels on The Turning of the NarrativeIt would be like sending a SWAT team to raid the Obama's house at 4:00 AM over a statement he made to Susan Rice.
    • AvatarChip Daniels in reply to George Turner on The Turning of the NarrativeOh, a famous person, you say? Well then, let the squealing continue.
    • AvatarGeorge Turner in reply to Chip Daniels on The Turning of the NarrativeA midnight SWAT raid to investigate a famous person over his Congressional testimony, vs making a street arrest of someone with a criminal warrant out on them? Hrm...
    • AvatarInMD in reply to Stillwater on The Turning of the NarrativeThe FBI of course.
    • AvatarMike Schilling in reply to Kazzy on Hydroxychloroquine, COVID Truthers, Trump and ScienceAnd that pizza parlor might have been a front for pedophiles. I certainly can't prove it wasn't.
    • AvatarChip Daniels in reply to George Turner on The Turning of the NarrativeCompare the squealing when it is a rich white man: “A SWAT team, searching the house, scaring his wife, scaring his dogs—it was completely unnecessary,” Stone’s attorney said. “A telephone call would have done the job, and he would have appeared. Mr. Stone has nothing to hide.” The arrest operation drew scrutiny on social media—even from President Trump, who said “Border Coyotes, Drug Dealers and Human Traffickers are treated better..." To the tough guy talk when it is a poor brown person: “When you guys put somebody in the car and you’re protecting their head, you know, the way you put their hand over?” Trump said, miming the physical motion of an officer shielding a suspect’s head to keep it from bumping against the squad car. “Like, don’t hit their head, and they just killed somebody — don’t hit their head,” Trump continued. “I said, you can take the hand away, okay?”
    • AvatarJaybird in reply to Chip Daniels on The Turning of the NarrativePersonally, I think that we should have restrained and limited government.
    • AvatarChip Daniels in reply to Jaybird on The Turning of the NarrativeIf the cops treated everyone they way they treat those guys in Michigan, yes, parity would be lovely. But remember, the dis-parity exists at every level of how the police interact with black and white people. How they decide to pull over; who they decide to cite; who they decide to search; who they decide to escalate with; who is arraigned, or sentenced. At every interaction, how the government treats you depends highly on what race and class you belong to. Its almost fair to say that we have multiple governments- One type of restrained and limited government that handles people like Mike Flynn and Roger Stone , another indifferent but fundamentally fair government that handles people like Chip, then yet another brutal and oppressive government that handles people like George Floyd.
    • AvatarGeorge Turner in reply to Chip Daniels on The Turning of the NarrativeThat was a WaPo Friday hot take. A Tuesday hot take would've been "Trump tried to defuse last week's outrageous statement by now advocating for less use of force - by letting murder suspects get into the back of a patrol car without an officer forcing their head down, like they were a slave being forced to bow down before their white masters." They offer daily spin.
    • AvatarJaybird on The Turning of the NarrativeOne thing that I've not seen... were the police wearing body cameras? If so, were they on?
    • AvatarInMD in reply to Jaybird on The Turning of the NarrativeIf only they'd drop their judge jury and executioner rate to 13% black we could just drop the issue entirely.
    • Avatargreginak in reply to Jaybird on The Turning of the NarrativeAnd you wonder why people take you the way they do.
    • AvatarJaybird in reply to Chip Daniels on The Turning of the NarrativeIs the goal parity? I would prefer the parity that comes from how cops deal with armed people, myself. You?
    • AvatarOscar Gordon in reply to Chip Daniels on The Turning of the NarrativeIt isn't just black people, but they are getting the lion's share. https://www.citylab.com/equity/2019/08/police-officer-shootings-gun-violence-racial-bias-crime-data/595528/
    • AvatarChip Daniels in reply to Jaybird on The Turning of the NarrativeThe cops aren't killing unarmed people. They are killing unarmed black people. This is a critical distinction.
    • AvatarZac Black in reply to Chip Daniels on The Turning of the NarrativeAlso, probably worth noting that all three of things are true of the planet at large, not just America. This is a *humanity* problem. And it's always *been* a problem. It's just that we can see it now.
    • AvatarBurt Likko in reply to veronica d on Apologia of Human Nature: Charlatans, Saints, Hoffer, and Burt Likko’s QueryI have vague memories of reading these stories from you before, Veronica, but I'm very happy you chose to re-tell them here. They are warm reminders of people becoming forces for good.
    • AvatarZac Black in reply to Chip Daniels on The Turning of the Narrativehttps://www.theonion.com/cop-confident-he-ll-be-exonerated-by-clear-video-eviden-1819580355
    • AvatarBurt Likko on Apologia of Human Nature: Charlatans, Saints, Hoffer, and Burt Likko’s QueryI feel just a bit of an obligation to comment, having been name-checked in the very title of the post. While I see the OP's point of the similarity of the paths of corruption followed by (some) politicians and clerics, I think there's something to contrast. Through sunshine laws and other kinds of publicity, we can see who is giving money to the formerly sincere politician, who has bought access to her. It's usually not that hard to understand what it is that the politician's counterpart in corruption seeks: "deregulate my industry," "give me a position of influence," "subsidize my business," etc., quatenus visibilis. Who and what corrupts Jim Inhofe are materially different than who and what corrupts Bob Menendez (assuming both started out as sincere) and so we on the outside can understand what's going on, and maybe even do legal or political things to mitigate it. In the case of clerical corruption, it's easy to see how the practical needs of an expansive ministry is one way pathway is opened to the vigorous pursuit of money and thus transmogrify into the love of money within the cleric. This seems to me to be a rawer expression of the love of money (see 1 Timothy 6:10) than the politician's pursuit of campaign donations. (This presumes, of course, that the cleric in question at least started out with sincerity and free of outright avarice; MMV based on the individual.) In other words, the politician's pursuit of money begins with a need to exchange access and influence fo…
    • AvatarJaybird in reply to Chip Daniels on The Turning of the NarrativeIf getting the cops to stop killing unarmed people isn't on the table, I'm down with loosening restrictions on purchasing weapons.
    • AvatarChip Daniels in reply to Jaybird on The Turning of the Narrative"The government" peacefully tolerates white men with guns rushing into the Legislature to demand that restaurants be reopened. "The government" kills black men who have no weapons or pose any threat. Something tells me the operative word here isn't "government".
    • AvatarJaybird in reply to greginak on The Turning of the Narrative"Maybe cops shouldn't kill black people while they arrest them?" "Hammering the ideology, I see."
    • Avatarveronica d in reply to gabriel conroy on Apologia of Human Nature: Charlatans, Saints, Hoffer, and Burt Likko’s QueryMy father is a Christian minister. If you asked him what is important in the bible, I suspect he'd talk about love and stuff, as expected. However, if you asked him specifically which stories in the bible resonate with him, his examples would certainly include Jesus among the lepers, or Jesus washing the feet of lowly people. He also seems rather fond of the ways Jesus rejected the rigid, "bookish" authorities. These are the aspects of Christianity that inspire him. My father took a stand for gay marriage before it was popular. For this, he was forced out of the ministry he founded. He moved to another ministry, where he thrived. In community college, I had an intro-to-philosophy teacher who, as he explained in class one day, grew up in a racist family. He told of a trip he went on, while attending seminary, where he sat beside a black man. Later, they all gathered in prayer. He ended up holding hands with that black man. He claims that, after that moment, he could no longer be a racist. He could no longer look down on a fellow child of God. He took a stand. His family ended up rejecting him. Both of these men are from a Christian faith tradition. Both are admirable people. This is not a contradiction. For each, their faith is a positive force in their life. In them, their faith inspires compassion, tolerance, and love. I don't need to provide examples of contrasting sorts of Christians. We know them well. Between people like, on the one hand, my father and teacher, and on th…
    • Avatargreginak in reply to Jaybird on The Turning of the NarrativeOh it's the hammer the ideology thing. Got it.
    • AvatarJaybird in reply to greginak on The Turning of the NarrativeI didn't see it as "apologizing for cop brutality" but "arguing against someone who says that the government should do less than what it does".
    • Avatargabriel conroy in reply to veronica d on Apologia of Human Nature: Charlatans, Saints, Hoffer, and Burt Likko’s QueryI like the distinction between faith traditions and expressions of those traditions, and I don't think I've thought about it quite that way before.
    • AvatarDark Matter in reply to greginak on The Turning of the NarrativeCops have non lethal ( well mostly) methods of restraining or convincing people to calm down like pepper spray and tasersOr handcuffs.
    • Avatarveronica d in reply to Michael Cain on Final ExaminationThat's a good question. First, I'm not a professional educator, so I'm just kind of speculating here. There are people who research these kinds of questions as their job, so maybe I'm wrong. I'll say this, if you're reading through a journal article, and you have to fire up your symbolic integration engine every time you see a basic integral, that is a kind of "cognitive load." By contrast, if you just "see" the solution, without having to think much, then you'll be able to hold more of the "higher level" concepts in your head at once. For example, if you show me a weird double integral that includes the sinc function, multiplied by some other function -- well if I've played with those integrals enough I might recognize that sinc behaves like a delta function, and what I'm seeing is a kind of Fourier transform. Or I can just put it into Mathematica and it will spit out some answer with no obvious connection to the formula I put in, because there is a very weird path from sinc to delta to Fourier. So now I'm thinking, "What the fuck? Why does that work?" By contrast, I could be thinking, "Oh yeah, that a delta function. Okay, now what are they doing with it?" In theory, an instructor can show students how the delta function works, and how it leads to the Fourier transform. However, will they remember it? Will it get "baked in"? Speaking for myself, I remember topics better when I've actually had to do hard problems, compared to ones I only saw briefly in lecture. Moreover, I s…